Take action now to stop cervical cancer

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion If you have insurance, talk to your doctor about cervical cancer screening. It’s a covered service under most health plans, including Medicaid plans and plans participating in the New York State of Health.Another way to prevent cervical cancer is by being vaccinated against the human papilloma virus (HPV). Research has shown that most cervical cancers are caused by HPV. The HPV vaccine is recommended for boys and girls between the ages of 9 and 14, and young adults through age 26. Ask your health care provider for more details.Wouldn’t you want to try to prevent cancer if you could? Contact the Cancer Services Program in your county at  518-770-6814 for more information.Suzanne HagadornAmsterdamThe writer is Health Education and Promotion coordinator for CSP Fulton, Montgomery and Schenectady counties.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation January is Cervical Health Awareness Month and the Cancer Services Program (CSP) of Fulton, Montgomery & Schenectady Counties wants to raise awareness that there are two ways to prevent cervical cancer.One way is through regular screening. Cervical cancer screening tests can find the cells that lead to cancer before it starts. These cells can then be removed. Screening also helps to find cancer early when it is most easily treated.The Cancer Services Program can help you get screened for cervical cancer, even if you don’t have insurance. We offer free cervical cancer screening to eligible uninsured women age 40 or older. Our program also provides free breast- and colon-cancer screening to eligible state residents. Call 1-866-442-CANCER (2262) today to find out if you qualify for free cancer screenings.last_img read more

Immigrant attacks an assault on freedoms

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionWith all this negative talk from the president about immigrants, let’s not forget that with the exception of Native Americans, we (including the president) are all here as a result of immigrants coming to this beloved United States of America. So as many make every attempt to put down immigrants, hopefully we will proudly affirm that we are here as a result of our family being immigrants. The United States is considered the “melting pot” where people from all over the world have come to partake in freedom of and from religion, freedom of the press, speech, assembly and all the other freedoms afforded to us by our Constitution.Anyone who attempts to weaken those freedoms or to put down immigrants as unworthy is a threat to the values of our nation and our own personal immigrant history. As responsible citizens, I hope we take action against those who intend to undermine those freedoms and voice objections toward certain people, no matter from what country they have come.Bill ShapiroSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcySchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Schenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashlast_img read more

Brixton in Greenford Park buy-up

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SDG takes spec option at Bishopsgate

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Thames Valley occupiers demand flexible leasing

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A fairway to development

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One croc wrangler returns to Australia but rescue efforts, crowdfunding still under way in Palu

first_imgRead also: ‘We are up to plan D or E’: Australian rescuers still have no luck catching crocodile“Chris had returned to his home country this morning, but Matt will remain in Palu for the next four days,” BKSDA Central Sulawesi wildlife rescue team leader Haruna said.He said the agency would continue local rescue efforts even after Wright returned to Australia.“We will keep using harpoons. Members of our team trained with Matt using harpoons yesterday. I hope our team will be able to put the knowledge to practice and work properly without Matt’s assistance,” Haruna said.Wright himself said in an Instagram post that everything was going well but that the BKSDA team had exhausted its funds.  “I’ve started a GoFundMe page, if you can jump on that, donate a bit of money, give these guys a bit of leg-up, and keep this operation rolling,” he said. “I’m only going to be here for another couple of days. Now if we catch him, we catch him. If not, it’s going to be an ongoing process.”Wilson and Wright previously joined BKSDA Central Sulawesi to assist in the rescue of the crocodile. The participation of the two Australians is based on a decree issued by the Environment and Forestry Ministry on Monday to BKSDA Central Sulawesi, into whose operational control the crocodile rescue team has been entrusted.Wilson and Wright had worked extensively with the agency in employing various tricks to attract the crocodile’s attention over the past five days – the latest of which entailed tying a live duck onto a drone and having it hover over the crocodile on Friday. The effort failed, however, as the crocodile ignored the bait and swam away, disappearing without a trace for a several hours.Wright tried to rescue the animal again using a harpoon, this time without Wilson’s help, alongside BKSDA Central Sulawesi personnel in the early hours of Sunday. His harpoon had caught on the crocodile’s hardened hide, but the animal eventually managed to shake it off.The team kept trying to catch the crocodile with harpoons until the animal disappeared again at dawn. “The word ‘tired’ is not in our vocabulary. We will track it down again,” Wright said. (rfa)Topics : “My adventure in Palu has come to an end! Absolutely devastated I’m not going to be here when Matty [Wright] finals [sic] gets him under control!” he wrote in the post, which came with video footage of himself explaining the difficulties he faced on Saturday night.He said he and other members of the rescue team, including Wright, had spent the entire day tracking the animal over 7 kilometers on foot.“Had a couple of close chances but once again the crowds, the high flowing water, full moon, and many other factors working against us!” he wrote.Wilson left Palu at 9 a.m. local time for Jakarta, from where he would catch a flight back to Australia.center_img After five days of engaging in a cat-and-mouse game with a crocodile in Central Sulawesi to no avail, Australian crocodile observer Chris Wilson – who had assisted in local rescue efforts alongside fellow expert Matthew Nicolas Wright – decided to bow out and return to his home country on Saturday.The crocodile, regularly spotted swimming in the Palu River, has had a used motorcycle tire stuck around its neck for years and has foiled repeated attempts to remove the tire, including a recent rescue contest held by the Central Sulawesi Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA Central Sulawesi).Wilson wrote on his official Instagram page @willow_nt that his adventure in Central Sulawesi had come to an end and expressed hope that his colleague Wright would liberate the crocodile from its rubber shackles in the next few days.last_img read more

COVID-19: Indonesia still allows flights to and from South Korea amid travel ban

first_imgThe Transportation Ministry said on Friday that flights to and from South Korea are still operating despite the East Asian country being an epicenter of the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak outside of China.The government announced on Thursday that Indonesia would temporarily restrict entry for people with a history of travel from the coronavirus-hit countries of Iran, Italy and South Korea in the wake of a significant surge of COVID-19 cases.The ministry’s air transportation director general, Novie Riyanto, said that the ban was only applicable to tourists from the three countries and not on the flights themselves.“We only prohibit tourists, but there are no restrictions on flights since they also carry cargo,” he said as quoted by kompas.com.Novie said the ban only applies to arrivals from certain cities in the countries. He also said the restriction of entry to or transit through Indonesia applies to all migrants or travelers who have been in one of the three countries in the 14 days before their arrival here.Read also: COVID-19: Indonesia expands travel restrictionsAs of Friday, South Korea confirmed a total of 6,284 coronavirus cases, giving it the most in the world outside of China. It also reported seven more deaths, bringing that total to 42.Meanwhile, Korean Air announced on Thursday that it would suspend all flights between Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Banten, and Incheon International Airport from Thursday to April 25 because of the virus outbreak.Previously, Foreign Minister Retno LP Marsudi said the temporary ban would come into effect on Sunday.Read also: Commentary: We should thank COVID-19 ‘Case 1’ instead of breaching her privacyShe said that travelers from Iran, Italy and South Korea who are coming from places outside of those countries would need to provide valid health certificates by the health authorities and failing to do so would result in them being denied entry to or transit through Indonesia.This is not the first travel restriction that Indonesia has imposed. The country already implemented a travel ban on visitors coming from China. The decision was made after Beijing imposed a lockdown on the city of Wuhan, the original epicenter of the outbreak.The government has been stepping up efforts to contain the virus after President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo announced on Monday that two Indonesians had been tested positive for it. (eyc) Topics :last_img read more

7.5-magnitude quake hits off Russia’s Kuril Islands: USGS

first_imgA 7.5-magnitude quake hit off Russia’s Kuril Islands on Wednesday, the US Geological Survey said.The quake hit at a depth of 59 kilometres (37 miles), USGS added.The US National Tsunami Warning Center said it was “analyzing the event to determine the level of danger”. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said “only very small tsunami waves were generated by this earthquake and there is no further threat”.It had previously warned tsunami waves were possible for coasts in the region.The four southernmost islands of the Kuril chain — Habomai, Shikotan, Etorofu and Kunashiri — have been disputed between Moscow and Tokyo since the end of World War II.The Kurils are known as the Northern Territories in Japan.Topics :last_img

Activists warn of potential graft as govt sets aside billions for COVID-19 relief

first_imgTopics : “We also have a bad precedent in healthcare procurement as our former health minister Siti Fadilah was sentenced for graft related to avian influenza vaccine procurement in 2005,” Wana said.Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) chief Firli Bahuri said on Wednesday that the antigraft agency would cooperate with national and regional COVID-19 task forces to prevent corruption in procurements. Previously, Firli also said the KPK would pursue the death penalty for those who embezzled COVID-19-related funds.  Activists from the Indonesian Forum for Budget Transparency (Fitra) and Indonesia Corruption Watch (ICW) have warned of the potential for graft as the government allocates billions of dollars to provide relief for those hardest hit by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo previously announced that the government would expand state spending by up to Rp 405.1 trillion (US$24.6 billion) in the wake of the outbreak, including Rp 110 trillion for social safety net programs that would aid people affected by the outbreak.Fitra secretary-general Misbah Hasan said the social safety net programs could easily miss their intended recipients due to faulty data.center_img “The ones affected by the epidemic are not only the poor but those in [COVID-19] vulnerable areas, which the government has not mapped out yet,” Misbah said at a virtual press discussion on Thursday.If the data was not clear, Misbah said some could receive double the allocated aid while others received less or none at all.He also said funds allocated to purchase medical supplies, personal protective equipment and test kits could be embezzled and bribery could take place in the procurement process. ICW activist Wana Alamsyah also said purchases could be a hot zone for graft, as the ICW had recorded 59 corruption cases involving medical equipment procurement with an estimated state loss of Rp 126.1 billion since 2017.last_img read more