Special Preview – Folio BtoB CEO Survey Report 2009

first_imgWhile the “tipping point” is a phrase that typically refers to digital surpassing print, online remains the second largest revenue stream for both larger (15.3 percent) and smaller (15.1 percent) b-to-b publishers. However, digital has surpassed events as a revenue stream for both larger and smaller b-to-b publishers in 2009. While there are some obvious exceptions to that (notably larger event producers like Advanstar), it suggests events have been hit even harder over the last year than expected. And while data/market information sales may be the next big opportunity for b-to-b publishers, it remains the smallest revenue stream, accounting for an average of 3.4 percent of overall revenue for larger publishers and 2 percent of revenue for smaller publishers generating less than $5 million per year. However, as digital strategies, and subsequently lead generation strategies, become more sophisticated, look for data/market information sales to soar over the next few years.   Thirty percent of publishers generating more than $5 million per year in revenue say they expect overall revenue to increase this year, with 20 percent saying the growth will be between 5 percent and 19 percent. However, larger publishers seem more doubtful about growth than smaller publishers, with 35 percent saying revenue will be flat and 33 percent saying it will decrease Meanwhile, the mix of revenue for b-to-b publishers continues to expand although print remains the dominant product, accounting for an average of 54.9 percent for smaller publishers and 52.9 percent for larger publishers (Chart 3) in 2009. Technology InvestmentRamping up the digital business and maximizing cost efficiencies are priorities for most publishers. However, there seems to be a growing divide between smaller and larger b-to-b publishers making significant investment in technology, especially during the downturn. Five percent of larger publishers spent $1 million or more on new technology in 2008, while the majority of respondents in the $5 million+ category say they spent between $100,000 and $249,999 on new technology last year. Just 6 percent say they did not invest in new technology (Chart 4).On the smaller publisher side, the majority of publishers spent less than $10,000 on new technology in 2008, while 23 percent say they did not invest in technology at all. In August, FOLIO: will release a special report analyzing five year’s worth of its B-to-B CEO surveys conducted with Readex Research, tracking everything from revenue performance to profit trends to technology investments and CEO salaries.In advance of the five-year outlook, FOLIO: is offering a preview of some of the findings specific to b-to-b publishers in 2008 and 2009.While b-to-b publishing is obviously challenged (American Business Media’s Business  Information Network says trade ad pages have sunk 28.9 percent for the first two months of 2009, representing 31 straight months of decline), a significant number of respondents to Folio:’s 2009 B-to-B CEO Survey think overall revenue will grow this year. Thirty-nine percent of respondents (Chart 1) generating less than $5 million in revenue per year think they will be up (with 17 percent of that group saying they’ll be up by 10 percent to 19 percent). Meanwhile, 30 percent of smaller publishers say revenue will remain flat from 2008 and 25 percent say it will decrease. Meanwhile, 32 percent of smaller publishers and 37 percent of larger publishers say they will launch an online startup in 2009 (20 percent of larger publishers also say they will launch a print magazine).While M&A remains light, 20 percent of larger publishers expect to acquire another company before the year is out (compared to 8 percent of smaller publishers).last_img read more

CHAMBER CORNER Learn About Wilmingtons Hair Designs

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce profiles a different member in the local media each week.  In this week’s “Chamber Corner,” the Chamber is spotlighting Wilmington’s Hair Designs.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedCHAMBER CORNER: Meet Assunta Perez Of DaMore LawIn “Business”CHAMBER CORNER: Learn About Michaela Klofac From AFLACIn “Business”CHAMBER CORNER: Learn About Align Credit Union’s Student AccountsIn “Business”last_img read more

Luncheon at Forest Park

first_imgForest Park Senior Center’s 34th Anniversary Celebration Luncheon will be held noon to 4 p.m., Aug. 23, at the Delta Community Center, 2501 Springhill Ave., Baltimore. The afternoon’s activities include raffles and a silent auction, vendors, dancing, gifts and card playing. All proceeds to benefit the Center.Forest Park is also sponsoring a trip to New York to see Motown: The Musical, Nov. 6. Seats are on sale for $200 until Aug. 20.For more information, call the Center at 410-466-2124.last_img

Fast photon control brings quantum photonic technologies closer

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Using photons instead of electrons to transmit information could lead to faster and more secure ways to communicate, among other advantages. Now a team of physicists has taken another step toward realizing quantum photonic technologies by demonstrating how to quickly manipulate single photons at the same wavelengths used in existing optical telecommunications networks. The ability to control a photon’s path and polarization in the time of a few nanoseconds could allow photonic circuits to be integrated with existing optical telecom networks, leading to significant improvements. Copyright 2012 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further Researchers demonstrate electo-optic modulation of single photons from a quantum dot This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img More information: Damien Bonneau, et al. “Fast Path and Polarization Manipulation of Telecom Wavelength Single Photons in Lithium Niobate Waveguide Devices.” PRL 108, 053601 (2012). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.053601 Citation: Fast photon control brings quantum photonic technologies closer (2012, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-02-fast-photon-quantum-photonic-technologies.html The physicists, from the University of Bristol in Bristol, UK, Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, UK, and the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience in Delft, The Netherlands, have published their study on the fast control of the path and polarization of single photons in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.The physicists worked on a quantum photonic device consisting of circuits through which single photons move, where the circuits can be reconfigured to change the path and polarization of a photon. One of the challenges for these quantum photonics circuits is to manipulate single-photon and multi-photon states at a fast rate.To address this challenge, the researchers used lithium niobate waveguides, which have proven to be capable of fast manipulation in current telecom modulators. By taking advantage of the electro-optic effect, the researchers demonstrated that applying a voltage to electrodes near the waveguide can rapidly manipulate quantum states of light made of one or two photons. They demonstrated this fast path and polarization control of photon pairs generated at the 1550-nm wavelength, which is used in telecom networks.“In this experiment, we demonstrate switching between two configurations of the circuit, each one leading to a different quantum state,” lead author Damien Bonneau of the University of Bristol told PhysOrg.com. “The reconfiguration rate was set at 4 MHz while previous experiments were performed with circuits reconfigured every several seconds. Switches using essentially the same technology are used every day in telecommunication networks to switch bits of information encoded in light pulses at 40 GHz. Such switches could in principle be used at a single-photon level too.”As Bonneau explained, the lithium niobate waveguide’s ability to manipulate quantum states of light provides a distinctly different approach compared with previous methods that worked much slower.“Until now, on-chip manipulation of quantum states of light had relied on heaters acting as slow phase shifters,” Bonneau said. “We demonstrate here that, by using one of the technologies on which the internet is built, one can not only switch light packets for routing classical information, but also rapidly engineer and manipulate quantum states of light.”As the scientists explained, the ability to rapidly control the polarization and path of single photons on a single platform will be useful for both fundamental quantum science and quantum technologies. They plan to expand their research to work toward several of these applications in the future.“Lithium niobate, the material which these devices are made of, can be used to probabilistically generate photons as well,” Bonneau said. “Superconducting single photon detectors could also be integrated onto such a chip. A technological platform combining probabilistic sources of single photons, circuits and detectors can open the way to several applications including reliable single-photon sources (by multiplexing several sources), quantum relays (required for long distance quantum communication), or quantum key distribution (which is required for quantum cryptography).”last_img read more

Supraballs offer a new way to color materials

first_img Play A video shows supraball painted flowers do not change color when the sample is rotated at different angles. Credit: Xiao et al., Sci. Adv. 2017;3: e1701151 Prior research has shown that there are two basic ways to produce color in a material. One is to use materials that have molecules capable of absorbing light, the other is to use materials that cause light to scatter in desired ways using nanostructures. Material scientists have found that using structures to create color has many advantages over those that require absorption, but making them that way has proven to be challenging. In this new effort, the researchers report that they have developed a technique that overcomes those challenges, allowing for the production of colored materials in a way that is fast, simple and scalable.The new technique was inspired by duck and turkey feathers. The team created tiny balls of melanin and then coated them with silica to create structures similar to those found in the bird feathers. Prior research has shown that the spacing between balls of melanin produces different colors. The clear silica coating serves that purpose by forcing the balls farther apart or closer together. The distance is determined by the thickness of the coating—a thick one forces the balls farther apart, while the opposite brings them closer together. Interestingly, observed under a microscope, they are all black. It is only when they are seen from a normal distance that the color emerges. The team notes that changing the size of the balls has no impact on the color produced.The team calls the result of their effort “supraballs.” After creating them and seeing how they worked, they studied them further to understand what was happening. They found that the cores were highly refractive while the shells had a low refractive index, which served to increase reflectance, resulting in colors that were brighter. They note that supraballs could be added directly to paint or plastic base materials to create desired colors and suggest they might also be useful for inks and cosmetic products. Citation: Supraballs offer a new way to color materials (2017, September 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-supraballs-materials.html Play Journal information: Science Advances A way to laser print colors that will not fade using tiny columns Each column represents supraballs made of different sizes of core-shell synthetic melanin nanoparticles. (A) Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of whole supraball morphologies. (B) High resolution SEM images of top surfaces of supraballs. (C) Cross-sectional transmission electron microscope images of the inner structure of supraballs. Scale bars, (A) 2 micrometers, (B) 500 nanometers and (C) 500 nanometers. Credit: Xiao et al., Sci. Adv. 2017;3: e1701151 An international team of researchers has created a new way to color manufactured materials. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they created the new coloring technique and why they believe it provides benefits over conventional methods. More information: Ming Xiao et al. Bioinspired bright noniridescent photonic melanin supraballs, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1701151AbstractStructural colors enable the creation of a spectrum of nonfading colors without pigments, potentially replacing toxic metal oxides and conjugated organic pigments. However, significant challenges remain to achieve the contrast needed for a complete gamut of colors and a scalable process for industrial application. We demonstrate a feasible solution for producing structural colors inspired by bird feathers. We have designed core-shell nanoparticles using high–refractive index (RI) (~1.74) melanin cores and low-RI (~1.45) silica shells. The design of these nanoparticles was guided by finite-difference time-domain simulations. These nanoparticles were self-assembled using a one-pot reverse emulsion process, which resulted in bright and noniridescent supraballs. With the combination of only two ingredients, synthetic melanin and silica, we can generate a full spectrum of colors. These supraballs could be directly added to paints, plastics, and coatings and also used as ultraviolet-resistant inks or cosmetics. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Explore further 2017 Phys.org A photo of a rainbow-like flowers, painted with supraball inks made of five different sizes of core-shell synthetic melanin nanoparticles. Credit: Ming Xiao, University of Akron PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more