Apples new file size limit lets you download 200MB apps without WiFi

first_img Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? A new download limit has arrived. Apple With Apple’s WWDC 2019 right around the corner, the company has made a change to its App Store that could make downloading apps a bit easier. But those on limited data plans should be wary.Apple’s cellular download limits for apps increased this week from 150MB to 200MB in the App Store. The change was spotted earlier by 9to5Mac. This means users will not see a message telling them to connect to Wi-Fi to download apps below the new file size limit. The last time Apple changed the download limits was September 2017, bumping it up from 100MB to 150MB. It tends to make the change every few years as cellular data services improve, such as in 2012 when the jump from 3G to 4G spurred the company to increase the data limit to a whopping 50MB. With 5G networks currently being tested by T-Mobile, AT&T, Sprint and Verizon, the iPhone maker seems to be prepping for the jump in speed coming. Apple didn’t immediately reply to a request for comment.  Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it CNET Apps Today See All Best Buy See It Boost Mobile Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Sprint • Apple iPhone XS reading • Apple’s new file size limit lets you download 200MB apps without Wi-Fi $999 $999 Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $999center_img Share your voice 0 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Tags Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Apple Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) See It $999 Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Mobile See It See it Post a comment 5G Sprint Applelast_img read more

National Poetry Month Killdeer By Nick Flynn

first_imgKilldeerYou know how it pretendsto have a broken wing tolure predators away from itsnest, how it staggers just out ofreach? If, at this moment,you’re feeling metaphorical,nest can be the whateverinside us that we think needsprotection, the whatever that issmall & hasn’t yet found itsway. Like us, it has lived so longon scraps, on what others haveleft behind, it thinks it could liveon air, on words, forever almost,it thinks it would be better to letthe predator kill it than to turnits back on that child again,forgetting that one lives insidethe other. Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: In this sound portrait, we meet poet Nick Flynn. He talks about his relationship to poetry, how poems can activate deep emotional states and writing as a child. He reads his poem, “Killdeer.”Nick Flynn has worked as a ship’s captain, an electrician and a caseworker with homeless adults. He is the author of 11 books, and his work has been translated into 15 languages. His honors include two PEN prizes, a Guggenheim Fellowship and finalist for France’s Prix Femina. He served as executive producer and artistic collaborator on the 2012 Focus Features film, Being Flynn, based on his memoir Another Bullshit Night in Suck City. Dividing his time between Houston and Brooklyn, he is a professor in the University of Houston Creative Writing Program, where he is in residence each spring. His forthcoming book, I Will Destroy You, will be published this fall by Graywolf Press. Xcenter_img This poem is reprinted with permission of the author.Music used: Seven League Boots (excerpt), Zinc (excerpt) and Hello Night (excerpt) by Zoë Keating from Into the TreesTo learn more about this series, go here. Geordie WoodNick Flynn Listen 00:00 /06:39last_img read more

Govt looks at taxes dividends to meet deficit target

first_imgGovernment is likely to step up efforts to mop up additional resources by hiking duties and seeking higher dividends from PSUs to make up for the anticipated shortfall in disinvestment and direct tax proceeds in its bid to meet the fiscal deficit target.The Finance Ministry had last week raised excise duty on petrol by Rs 1.60 per litre and the same on diesel by 40 paise, which is expected to fetch the exchequer an additional revenue of about Rs 3,200 crore during the rest of the fiscal. This will help the government in partly meeting the shortfall in disinvestment and direct tax realisation. Also Read – Punjab & Sind Bank cuts MCLR by up to 20 basis pointsDue to volatile market conditions, the disinvestment department could garner Rs 12,600 crore so far this fiscal. It has a target of Rs 69,500 crore to be garnered from minority stake sale in PSUs as well as strategic stake sale. With seven months of the current fiscal already over, the Department of Disinvestment has already indicated to the Finance Ministry that it would not be possible to meet the ambitious target.As regards dividend, the government is pushing blue-chip PSUs to either step up their capex or pay higher dividends and not sit on cash pile. Also Read – ‘The great gold bull market has begun’The government had budgeted to collect Rs 36,174 crore by way of dividend from the public sector enterprises, higher than last year’s realisation of Rs 28,423 crore. It has already received a dividend of Rs 65,896 crore from RBI, which is higher than this year’s budget projection of Rs 64,477 crore.Making up for the shortfall in disinvestment through other sources is essential for meeting the fiscal deficit target of 3.9 per cent of GDP.last_img read more

New Option for Online Backup Offers USB Ease Without the Fear of

first_img 2 min read This story appears in the January 2012 issue of . Subscribe » Register Now » January 19, 2012 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Web-based data storage services such as Dropbox, Box.net and other cloud options are starting to replace the trusty–but easily misplaced–portable, solid-state flash drive. But limits on the amount of data that can be stored online, the cost of such storage and nagging security issues limit how small firms tend to use these backup services.Boston-based iTwin is attempting to ease the pain of the online backup process by combining the strengths of web-based data storage with (now) old-fashioned flash drives. The company’s new USB-based file-sharing tool lets users pass data between two internet-connected computers without using a dedicated web storage service or remote access software.Related: This Cloud-Based Storage Service Offers Deep Features for BusinessesThe iTwin is clever, but not completely intuitive: Users plug the $99, two-part device–which looks like a normal USB flash that can be snapped in half–into a computer. The software launches from the iTwin automatically, and users designate which files or folders should be shared. Next, users detach one half of the iTwin, leaving the other half plugged into the main computer. Then they just plug the detached half into the USB port of any other web-connected Mac or PC, and voilà: the remote PC has direct access to shared files back at the office.The effect, we found, was a bit like having a very large, web-connected flash drive but with an incredible benefit: If the iTwin gets misplaced, there won’t be any data lost.Brian Chamberlain, iTwin’s vice president of marketing, says the service is particularly useful for employees who need a secure way to share large, confidential files (such as accounting data) with remote clients.Related: How Many Bytes Do You Need for Your Data-Storage Buck?One knock against iTwin: For now, it allows sharing between only two computers. But Chamberlain says the company is working on enhancements, set to roll out later this year, that will allow the device to access multiple computers running on the same office network.Either way, for on-the-go entrepreneurs looking for a way to bypass the headaches of web storage or potential data loss, the iTwin is worth a look. last_img read more