Osteoporosis is not only a womens disease

Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 18 2018UMass Lowell wins $2.6 million grant to study bone health in menOsteoporosis, a bone disease that can result in painful fractures – typically in the back, hip or wrist – is often thought of as a woman’s disease. But men get it too, just usually later in life than women.Segment the population even more and researchers find that Puerto Rican men who live on the U.S. mainland are at much greater risk of thinning bones than previously thought. Researchers at UMass Lowell will assess bone strength and nutrition among men and women in this population in a study that could lead to improvements in treatments for all people who suffer from osteoporosis.The National Institutes of Health has awarded $2.6 million to UMass Lowell researchers to evaluate bone health risks among this population. The research team is led by UMass Lowell Prof. Katherine Tucker and includes assistant professors Kelsey Mangano and Sabrina Noel of the Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences Department.Related StoriesTop four things seniors need to know to have a safe and healthy summerUMN research evaluates impact of multimorbidity on hip fracture probability in older womenPenn study reveals link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosisThis study is among the first of its kind to examine whether differences in bone strength between adults with and without Type 2 diabetes are due in part to compounds called advanced glycation end products (AGEs).Found in many foods and formed when meats are grilled, roasted, seared, fried or baked, AGEs contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.”Studying the relation of AGEs to bone health is novel among humans,” said Tucker, who also leads UMass Lowell’s Center for Population Health. “We expect that the research results will provide insight for developing interventions to prevent bone loss and fracture risk in adults.”The UMass Lowell team will study about 800 people living in the Boston area who are also participants in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study Projects, which is a series of in-depth studies conducted over the past 12 years that has allowed researchers to follow the nutrition and health risk factors of 1,500 members of this population.Participants in the UMass Lowell study will complete a questionnaire, provide blood samples and get bone scans. In addition to the bone mineral density test that measures bone loss, the research team will use a new approach that assesses bone strength.”We know now that the bone density scans that we use today do not capture the full extent of fracture risk,” said Tucker. “In our study, we’ll be using microindentation, a new test that measures bone material strength. Using this new method in combination with the bone mineral density test will give us a better picture of bone health as it relates to nutrition and other health factors.”Early this year, Tucker received a $3.9 million grant from the NIH to study the effect of highly processed foods on dementia in this same population. Source:https://www.uml.edu/ read more

Older adults care about strangers welfare in financial decisionmaking study finds

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 30 2018A recent study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that when it comes to making financial decisions under risk, older adults will regard the financial outcomes of others’ as their own and make choices that they would have selected for themselves.”Citizens in approximately one third of the countries around the world rely heavily on decisions made by older adults who may be government, business or community leaders. It is important to not only understand how these elderly people make decisions for themselves, but also how they make decisions on behalf of others, as their decisions can lead to significant gains or losses,” said team leader Assistant Professor Yu Rongjun, who is from the Department of Psychology at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.The results of this study were reported in the journal Psychology and Aging in September 2018.Closing the knowledge gap in financial decision-makingPeople often need to make financial choices for themselves, and sometimes, on behalf of others. Studies have shown that younger adults take more risks when making financial decisions for others. However, there is a lack of understanding about the decision-making behavior of the elderly.To address this knowledge gap, Asst Prof Yu and his team conducted studies to compare how younger adults and older adults make financial decisions, both for themselves and for others.The NUS study was conducted from 2016 and 2017, and involved 191 Singaporean participants. Among them, 93 were older adults with an average age of 70, while 98 were young adults averaging 23 years old.The participants were asked to complete a series of computerized decision-making tests in which they were assessed based on the choices they made under uncertainties. The research team used computational modeling to analyze two aspects of the participants’ financial decision-making: loss aversion, which is a tendency to weight potential losses more strongly than potential gains; risk-aversion asymmetry, which looks at the tendency to be risk-averse for potential gains and risk-seeking for potential losses.Financial decisions vary with age Related StoriesBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustrySchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchThe results show that when younger adults are making financial decisions on behalf of others, they take more risks even when the decisions put the person they are acting for at a disadvantage. For the seniors, they make similar choices for themselves and when they act for others. Hence, the findings suggest that older adults care more about strangers’ welfare.”Our results demonstrate that decision-makers of different age groups have different motivational goals. The young adults may treat the finances of others’ differently from their own, perhaps regarding them as being less important. On the other hand, the older generation may care more about social harmony and emotional experience, and have less emphasis on material gains,” explained Asst Prof Yu.He further elaborated, “Although we did not manipulate decision-making power and participants simply made choices for strangers in our study, we speculate that similar age-dependent decision-making patterns may also apply to real-life workplace. For instance, a young boss may choose one insurance plan for his employees and another plan for himself. The plan that he picks for others may be more risky and potentially disadvantageous compared to the plan he chooses for himself. On the other hand, an older boss is likely to select the same plan for his staff and himself. The findings of this study resonate with our earlier research which showed older adults are more generous towards strangers.”To deepen their understanding on the financial decision-making process of people from different age groups, Asst Prof Yu and his team will be conducting neuroimaging studies to examine the underlying neural basis of their observations. Source:https://news.nus.edu.sg/press-releases/welfare-in-financial-decision-makinglast_img read more

Hungary Audi workers in rare strike over wages

first_img © 2019 AFP Audi, one of Hungary’s largest exporters, employs some 13,000 staff in the western city of Gyor where it has made engines since 1994 Flights scrapped as Berlin airports brace for Monday strike Workers at the German car giant Audi’s plant in Hungary called a one-week strike Wednesday over a wage dispute, a rare case of industrial unrest in an economy that relies on the automotive sector. Audi, one of Hungary’s largest exporters, employs some 13,000 staff in the western city of Gyor where it has made engines since 1994. Car-making accounts for almost a third of Hungary’s total industrial output, and around 20 percent of exports.The plant’s largest union – the 9,000-member AHFSZ – said the strike would last from Thursday to January 31 and affect all parts of the facility.AHFSZ leaders told local media that talks with management would continue during the strike, but that it could be extended if no agreement is reached. Some 4,000 of the workforce at the Audi plant downed tools for a two-hour “warning strike” last week. Talks over 2019 wage levels began last September, with workers seeking an 18 percent wage increase.According to AHFSZ, workers at a Mercedes factory in Kecskemet, central Hungary, received a 22 percent wage increase for 2019 without having to resort to strike action.Since Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s government tightened strike rules in 2012, industrial action has been rare in Hungary.After new changes to labour laws were passed by parliament in December, unions across the economy have threatened coordinated strike action.That legislation increases the amount of overtime employers can demand from workers and has been dubbed a “slave law” by unions, political parties, and civil groups who have held a series of street demonstrations in protest.center_img Citation: Hungary Audi workers in rare strike over wages (2019, January 23) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-hungary-audi-workers-rare-wages.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Tiny Fighting Worms Make One of the Loudest Sounds in the Ocean

first_img 13 Extremely Weird Animal Feet The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65945-tiny-worms-emit-loud-noise.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?01:09Robots to the Rescue02:27Robotic Arms关闭 Tiny, feisty worms that live off the coast of Japan fight by headbutting each other — and they aren’t quiet about it. During these feuds, the worms emit one of the loudest sounds in the ocean, according to a new study. The source of the underwater hullabaloo is a nearly transparent segmented worm called the Leocratides kimuraorum, which lives inside sponges 279 to 554 feet (85 to 169 meters) deep off the coast of Japan. [The 12 Weirdest Animal Discoveries]Advertisement These wigglies are just a tad more than an inch (29 millimeters) long and have lengthy tentacles and a big mouth (literally). These seemingly quiet creatures revealed their true nature under the spotlight in the lab. A group of researchers used an instrument called a hydrophone to record 15 pops that were emitted from three kimuraorums as they were fighting. In a marine feud researchers dub “mouth-fighting,” the worms approached each other headfirst with their mouths open. During such encounters, the worms’ pharynx muscles expand rapidly, creating a cavitation bubble that collapses and produces a loud “pop” while the worms launch into each other. The researchers found that these pops can reach 157 decibels in the water (which is a different measurement than decibels in the air). From right next to the water tank, the pops sounded like humans snapping their fingers, lead author Goto Ryutaro, an assitant professor at Kyoto University told Live Science. “Though they probably sound louder if you hear them in the water.” The worms are as loud as snapping shrimps, which are one of the biggest noisemakers in the ocean, the authors wrote. What’s more, they found that these worms did not make any noise when simply disturbed, they only did so when they were fighting. They “may use mouth-fighting to defend territory or living chambers from other worms,” the authors wrote July 8 in the journal Current Biology. “A loud pop may be a byproduct of the rapid mouth attack, but it may also aid intraspecific communication.” A loud noise could somehow determine the victor of the fight or even reveal the whereabouts of nearby worms, they wrote. Originally published on Live Science. Strange Love: 10 Animals with Truly Weird Courtship Ritualslast_img read more

3 killed in fire at Delhi factory

first_imgPublished on COMMENTS SHARE Two women and a teenager were killed in a massive fire at a two-storeyed hardware factory in Delhi on Saturday morning, police said. The blaze broke out around 9 am at the factory in Shahdara’s Jhilmil Industrial Area, which houses several industrial units, and 31 fire tenders were rushed to the spot, the Delhi Fire Services said. The blaze started from the first floor of the building and engulfed the whole structure, the police said. According to the supervisor of the factory, Pradeep, around 60 workers were present inside the factory that usually opens at around 9 in the morning. Cartons kept inside the factory, involved in manufacturing and packaging of taps, caught fire quickly and aided in the spread of the fire, he said. Pradeep said most of the workers managed to escape the factory. “But the three victims were present on the second floor and could not come downstairs as it was filled with smoke,” he said. A fire department official said five people were trapped on the second floor of the building and two of them survived. A fire personnel also sustained injuries during the rescue operation. Deputy Commissioner of Police (Shahdara) Meghna Yadav said two women — Manju Devi (50), Sangeeta Devi (46) — and a youth, Shoaib Ali (19) died in incident. The victims may have died due to asphyxiation as there were no major burn injuries, the police said. Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal visited the site with Industries Minister Satyendar Jain. Kejriwal said a probe would be conducted to ascertain the reason behind the incident and action would be taken against anyone not following fire norms. He announced an ex gratia of Rs 5 lakh for the kin of the deceased. SHARE SHARE EMAIL July 13, 2019 fire COMMENT Fire personnel seen dousing the fire which broke out at one of the factory at the Jhilmil Industrial Area in New Delhi on Saturday, July 13, 2019. – Photo: R V Moorthylast_img read more

Samajwadi Partys Azam Khan faces arrest in land grabbing torture case

first_img Next Samajwadi Party’s Azam Khan faces arrest in land grabbing, torture caseTwenty-six farmers have stated that Azam Khan and Aalehasan illegally detained and pressured them to sign on a forged sale deed in a bid to acquire their land running into several thousand hectares.advertisement Indo-Asian News Service New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 19:07 IST Azam Khan allegedly forged documents and grabbed land worth over several hundred crores for Mohammed Ali Jauhar University. (Photo: PTI)More than two dozen poor farmers were illegally detained and tortured for several days before their lands were “forcibly grabbed” by senior Samajwadi Party (SP) leader and MP Azam Khan in Uttar Pradesh’s Rampur district, the police said on Saturday.According to a criminal case registered at Rampur’s Azim Nagar Police Station, Azam Khan and his close aide, former Deputy Superintendent of UP Police Aalehasan Khan, allegedly forged documents and grabbed land worth over several hundred crores for Mohammed Ali Jauhar University, a multi-crore private project of the SP leader.”Twenty-six farmers have stated that Azam Khan and Aalehasan illegally detained and pressured them to sign on a forged sale deed in a bid to acquire their land running into several thousand hectares,” Ajay Pal Sharma, Superintendent of Police, Rampur said.”When the farmers refused to sign on the papers, their land was forcibly occupied. Aalehasan, then circle officer of Rampur, misused his official position in grabbing the land belonging to the poor. After verifying facts we have registered a criminal case against Azam Khan and Aalehasan,” said Sharma.The case against the SP leader was registered on the basis of an enquiry by the UP Revenue Department, which checked all relevant documents and recorded statements of farmers who mainly belong to the minority community.”On the basis of the main complaint of the Revenue Department, now 26 separate cases will be filed (against Azam Khan) as it involves different patches of land and different owners,” said the Rampur district police chief.Asked whether Azam Khan could be arrested, Sharma said, “It may happen any time. The investigation is on.”The FIR (relating to case) says besides grabbing farmers’ lands, Azam Khan, also misused his position (as Cabinet Minister of UP during 2012-2017) to illegally occupy over 5,000 hectares of land adjoining the banks of Kosi river, which flows along the University campus.The land falls by the Kosi riverside and cannot be acquired. “But revenue records were allegedly forged and the land, worth over several hundred crores, was illegally occupied by Mohammed Jauhar Ali University,” said a Revenue Officer.According to the Revenue Officer, the forged documents to fraudulently occupy the riverbed, are now strong evidence against Azam Khan.Azam Khan’s dream project, Mohammed Ali Jauhar University, was conceived as a private Urdu university in 2004. Acquisition of land and construction of the university campus started rapidly after the Samajwadi Party (SP) came to power in UP and Azam Khan became one of its most powerful ministers.In 2012, the Akhilesh Yadav government granted the university’s lifelong chancellorship to Azam Khan, a move which was opposed by then UP Governor.Last month, BJP leader Jayaprada, who contested the 2019 Lok Sabha polls against Azam Khan, filed a complaint with the Election Commission seeking the newly elected MP’s disqualification for also holding an office of profit as the chancellor of Mohammed Ali Jauhar University.Jaya Prada cited two examples — one of Sonia Gandhi and another of Jaya Bachchan — both of whom had to resign as MPs and re-contest polls on grounds of holding the office of profit.IANS tried to contact Azam Khan for his comments on being booked in cases of land grabbing, but could not reach him. A Samajwadi Party office-bearer said the BJP was trying to malign the SP stalwart’s image, who had established a world-class university for the people of UP in Rampur.Also Read | FIR against Azam Khan for sexist khaki underwear remark against Jaya PradaAlso Read | Jaya Prada challenges election of Azam Khan from Uttar Pradesh, RampurAlso Watch | He always lies, is taking U-turn: Jaya Prada on Azam Khan’s sexist remarksFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhanlast_img read more