UPDATE Pie Me Over Set To Open In Wilmington This Fall

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — In an update to a February 2019 story, Wilmington Apple has learned that Pie Me Over, a gourmet chicken pot pie shop, will be opening in Wilmington this fall.“Due to contractor delays, we estimate the shop will be open in late September or early October,” owner Marje Hammond told Wilmington Apple.The shop, located at the former Fantastic Sam’s location (217 Main Street) inside the Wilmington Crossing plaza, will sell not just chicken pot pies, but other savory pies, including veggie pies, beef pies, and quiches. Pies will be cooked daily and sold in three different sizes (Individual, Duo, & Large) and with four different types of crust. A gluten free chicken pot pie option will also on the menu.The shop is take-out only and will follow the “take and bake” model — customers take home the fresh or frozen pies and bake in their own ovens.Pie Me Over originally opened in Las Vegas in 2014 and received strong reviews from customers, food critics and the local press. The sop, for example, is a prefect average score of 5 stars on Yelp with 122 total reviews.The shop closed in the spring of 2018 after its owners, Marje Hammond and Feliciano Savilengo, relocated to Massachusetts. They’ve selected Wilmington for Pie Me Over’s new home.“Pie Me Over is the first retail pie shop of its kind in Massachusetts and across the country selling unbaked fresh & frozen pies with a variety of crusts,” reads the company’s website. “We felt that most Chicken Pot Pies and other savory pies lacked flavor, and were much too salty. We also strived to perfect the Traditional crust and introduced our own special crusts such as Cheddar, Habanero Cheddar, and fresh Garlic.”Follow Pie Me Over on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedChicken Pot Pie Shop To Open In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NEW RESTAURANT ALERT: Habit Burger Grill To Open Its First New England Location Right Here In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Did you know Salman Khan has given major number of debutants to

first_imgSalman KhanInstagramSalman Khan is not just a superstar in the industry for his acting but in real life too as he has often encouraged newer talents in Bollywood. Thus, many actor, actresses, music composers, and directors go to him at the beginning of their career.Salman has been a ‘Bhai’ to many in Bollywood and has a huge circle of friends. The actor, who has been consistently playing the lead hero since more than 31 years now, still holds his place among the top stars of the film industry with almost 100 percent success rate. The actor also mentors and launches several new faces in the industry.Let’s check out the number of people Salman has launched since the past couple of years.With his latest release, he introduced Pranutan and Zaheer Khan. Last year he introduced Aayush Sharma and Warina Hussain with Loveyatri. Before that, the actor introduced Athiya Shetty and Suraj Pancholi with Hero, Daisy Shah in Jai Ho, Sonakshi Sinha with Dabbang, Zareen Khan in Veer, Sneha Ulla in Lucky: No Time for Love, Katrina Kaif in Maine Pyaar Kyun Kiya, Bhumika Chawla in Tere Naam, singer and music composer Armaan Malik and Amaal Malik. In future he will be launching Ashwami Majarekar in Dabaang 3 and Isabel Kaif in her upcoming film.The actor is currently busy with his upcoming film Bharat, in which he co-stars with Katrina Kaif and Disha Patani. Bharat has been shot in various locations such as Abu Dhabi, Malta and Punjab. The actors have in the past shared a number of pictures and video clips from the film’s shoot. For one of the shoots, the Wagah border in Punjab was recreated. The film will see Salman play multiple roles. Bharat is the official Hindi remake of 2014 Korean drama Ode to My Father.last_img read more

Reliance Industries GE ink agreement to foray into industrial IoT

first_imgMukesh Ambani’s Reliance Industries on Thursday announced that it has formed a partnership with US-based GE to drive digital transformation in the industrial world. The two companies will work together to build joint applications on GE’s Predix platform, which is considered the operating system for Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).The partnership agreement, which was signed in the presence of Jeff Immelt, Chairman and CEO, GE and Mukesh Ambani, Chairman and Managing Director, Reliance Industries Limited, would provide IIoT solutions to customers in oil and gas, fertiliser, power, health care, telecom and in other industries.”GE will provide its Predix cloud offering, industrial internet applications and data science expertise,” the company said in a statement.RIL will also offer nationwide connectivity infrastructure to customers through a 4G network powered by Jio. The customers would be benefited in various ways such as operational efficiencies, profitability and new revenue streams.”A one percent productivity gain for companies creates around $250 billion value over 15 years, across these key energy and infrastructure industries. The digital market is growing at a fast pace with IIoT contributing the highest degree of growth at over 10 percent,” it said.Digital solutions have the potential to curb expenditure worth billions of dollars every year.”The partnership with Reliance Industries will shape the future of the Industrial Internet not just in India but globally. The possibilities that it opens to develop solutions on our Predix platform for the industrial sector are endless,” Jeff Immelt said in the statement.last_img read more

A fair for the frenzied

first_imgThough his real name is Siddiq Miah, he is quite all right with the local people calling him ‘Siddiq Pagol’ (mad Siddiq).This 60-year-old farmer has been organising a ‘pagol mela’ (mad people’s fair) in his village Kalagaon in Uttar Sreepur union of Tahirpur, Sunamganj district.Previously the fair was held indoors and included a feast and music. This year it was outdoors and on a much grander scale. The fair even had open-air stalls.This Pagoler Mela was held on Tuesday and Wednesday at the the Kalagaon Government Primary School grounds. The local government officials and the common people joined the ‘mad’ people in the fun.Siddiq said as no one pays heed to the welfare of the mad, and so he arranges this fair and invites everyone from the area. He arranges meals for the two days and the locals also help a lot, he said.As a devotee of Maizbhandari, Siddiq said, “This Pagol Mela is both an urs (a religious congregation) and a fair. We sing and chant prayers (zikr) as if in a frenzy throughout the night. No one bothers about the mad people. Since I am one, I think about the others.”Charagaon dweller Tajul said, “I am a disciple of Baba Bhandari and so is Siddiq Pagol. How can a crazed one not respond to this call?”A local, Ali Hossain, said, “There were some stalls this year with more people. There was music throughout Tuesday night and the observation was dedicated to Maizbhandari.”last_img read more

Meet The Man Believed To Be The First Black Millionaire In Texas

first_img Share CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY / KERAWilliam Madison McDonald, an influential banker and political kingmaker, is commemorated in a mural at Fort Worth’s Intermodal Transportation Center.William Madison McDonald is far from a household name these days, but he was a legend in his day. Born 150 years ago, McDonald is widely believed to have been the first black millionaire in Texas.The son of a former slave, McDonald became an influential banker and a political force who helped shape Fort Worth at the turn of the 20th century, using his wealth and connections to help lift up his city’s African-American community.Listen to the KERA News story.“When I was young growing up, Bill McDonald was a mythical character. But we knew he was real … we knew he was buried, for example. We knew he had lived and been buried. But he was larger than life,”  said Bob Ray Sanders, a retired Fort Worth Star-Telegram columnist and former KERA newsman.When Sanders was growing up in the 1950s and early ‘60s, the east side of Fort Worth’s downtown was the place to be. The intersection of Jones Street and Ninth Street, Sanders said, was the heart of a thriving black business district in the still-segregated city that thronged with African-American-owned restaurants, hotels, night clubs, shops and even a hospital.“From the Convention Center almost to the Court House, these were black businesses,” Sanders recalled. “It was here, and it was vibrant.”Lifting the communityWilliam Madison McDonald became a major player in Texas Republican Party in the 1890s, representing the state as a delegate to national party conventions.A bank stood at the center of all that activity. Sanders said that so much of the city’s black business class was tied in one way or another to Fraternal Bank and Trust. Historians say it was the first black-owned bank in Texas. Its founder was William Madison McDonald.“From basically the beginning of the 20th century, Bill McDonald’s imprint was on Fort Worth,” Sanders said. “He made his mark, and he kept making his mark, until the day he died.”Before he came to Fort Worth, McDonald lived in Kaufman County. Born in 1866, his father was a freed slave, a man who had been owned by the Ku Klux Klan’s first grand wizard. At just 8 years old, McDonald went to work for a white lawyer, a man who eventually helped him to go to college.McDonald studied religion, ran a school and organized a state fair to show off the accomplishments of black farmers; all before he turned 21.“Anything that he took his hand to prospered. And he was showing others that you can do this too,” said Opal Lee, who helped launch Fort Worth’s black genealogical and historical society.Lee is 90 years old now, but she grew up seeing McDonald. It was at the end of his life, at the beginning of hers. Lee remembers walking past the millionaire’s massive mansion on Terrell Avenue on her way to the movie theater.“He’d be sitting out sunning: A little, old man. And I wanted so much to say something to him, but I was afraid. I never spoke to him,” she saidMcDonald left Kaufman County in 1906 for Fort Worth, and quickly became a revered leader in his adopted city. He bought a handful of businesses, built several buildings, and opened the Fraternal Bank and Trust. Opal Lee had an account there.McDonald’s bank was a simple place, Lee said. No fancy vault, just few desks and an ornate cage where the money was locked away.Still, it was a thriving financial institution. It not only survived the Great Depression, but was reported to have bailed out struggling white-owned banks. Originally the repository for the wealth of black Masons, Fraternal Bank and Trust served the city’s African-Americans when white banks weren’t open to them. Access to capital, Lee said, helped the community lift itself up.“He helped a lot of young black entrepreneurs get started in business,” he said.A political kingmakerBefore he became a banker, though, McDonald was active in politics. And at that, too, he excelled. He was a close ally of Col. Ned Green, a massively wealthy white railroad and banking magnate, and the two established themselves as a political power brokers.“Green and McDonald teamed up, and they ran the Republican Party in Texas,” he saidIn the decades that followed the end of slavery, a biracial coalition dominated the state Republican Party. McDonald became a shot caller in that so-called Black and Tan faction – and served as a delegate at state and national conventions. Reby Cary, a historian, educator and civil rights leader, said that African Americans at that time almost exclusively backed Republicans.“That party freed us. It was Abraham Lincoln,” Cary said. “We got freed because the Republicans freed us,” he saidCary, now in his 90s, grew up four blocks from McDonald. He said McDonald promoted a philosophy of black self-reliance, challenging African Americans to build their own institutions and businesses. A lifelong Republican, Cary said McDonald’s message shaped his own thinking, and is still relevant today.“In the first place, he used to tell us, he said, if blacks want your own business, you set it up. If you want your own newspaper, you set it up,” he said.A fading legacyMcDonald died in 1950. He left no heirs – his only son died while away at college. His grave in the Old Trinity Cemetery in Fort Worth is marked by a huge obelisk, and a historic marker recalling his influence.In the decades since his death, many of the buildings McDonald owned and built have disappeared. The bank was torn down. The Jim Hotel – where legends like Ella Fitzgerald and Count Basie stayed and played – is gone. Both his mansion and a sprawling masonic temple he built were demolished.At the train station in downtown Fort Worth, at the intersection where McDonald’s bank once stood, there’s a mural that celebrates the city’s black history. Sanders said the mural makes clear how much William McDonald’s story is woven throughout the history of Fort Worth’s African American community at the beginning of the last century.“Bill McDonald was a way maker, for a lot of people. Including me,” Sanders said. “He paved the way for a lot of people. He certainly wasn’t the only one, but he was a major figure in our history, and we shouldn’t forget that.”Sanders said that when he was a kid, you couldn’t grow up black in Fort Worth without hearing about William McDonald. Today, he said, young people don’t learn a lot of local black history. So while McDonald’s buildings are gone, Sanders said it’s on us to decide if his memory lives on.Copyright 2016 KERA-FM. To see more, visit KERA-FM.last_img read more

Researchers find signs of western Eurasian genes in southern African Khoisan tribes

first_img Scientists believe humans evolved from ancestral primates in Africa several hundred thousand years ago, but it wasn’t until approximately 65,000 years ago that they made their way out of Africa and into the Middle East and eventually the rest of the world. Until recently, that migration has been viewed by most scientists as a one-way trip. Gene studies over the past several years has turned that thinking around, however, as its been found that many people in several parts of Africa have European or Asian gene segments in their DNA. In this latest study, the researchers have found evidence of Eurasian genes in tribespeople who were thought to have a purely African ancestry.The Khoisan tribespeople of today still live much as their ancestors did—they are hunter-gathers who are also pastoralists—they are most familiar to westerners as the people who speak with distinctive clicking noises. Until now, they were believed to have the purest African gene pool due to their thousands of years of isolationist practices. The team acquired DNA samples from 32 people living in Khoisan tribes in southern Africa—an analysis revealed Eurasian gene segments in all of them. But that wasn’t the end of the story. To understand how the gene fragments got into the Khoisan tribespeople, the researchers turned to archeological and linguistic evidence to build a possible time-line of events. In so doing, they’ve found what they believe to have been a migration back into Africa by people of the Middle East (ancestors of the people that migrated to Europe and Asia) approximately 3000 years ago. Those people made their way to various parts of the continent, including a part of eastern Africa from which the Khoisan tribespeople had migrated south approximately 900 and 1800 years ago.The researchers found something else—the Khoisan tribespeople also had snippets of Neanderthal DNA in their genes as well—courtesy of their Eurasian heritage. 33-year-old San tribesman from Namibia. Image: Wikipedia. Genetic admixture in southern Africa: Ancient Khoisan lineages survive in contemporary Bantu groups (Phys.org) —A team of researchers with representatives from the U.S., Germany and France has found evidence of western Eurasian genes in Khoisan tribes living in southern Africa. This suggests, the researchers conclude in a paper they’ve had published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that a migration from the Middle East back to Africa occurred approximately 3000 years ago. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Ancient west Eurasian ancestry in southern and eastern Africa, Joseph K. Pickrell, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1313787111AbstractThe history of southern Africa involved interactions between indigenous hunter–gatherers and a range of populations that moved into the region. Here we use genome-wide genetic data to show that there are at least two admixture events in the history of Khoisan populations (southern African hunter–gatherers and pastoralists who speak non-Bantu languages with click consonants). One involved populations related to Niger–Congo-speaking African populations, and the other introduced ancestry most closely related to west Eurasian (European or Middle Eastern) populations. We date this latter admixture event to ∼900–1,800 y ago and show that it had the largest demographic impact in Khoisan populations that speak Khoe–Kwadi languages. A similar signal of west Eurasian ancestry is present throughout eastern Africa. In particular, we also find evidence for two admixture events in the history of Kenyan, Tanzanian, and Ethiopian populations, the earlier of which involved populations related to west Eurasians and which we date to ∼2,700–3,300 y ago. We reconstruct the allele frequencies of the putative west Eurasian population in eastern Africa and show that this population is a good proxy for the west Eurasian ancestry in southern Africa. The most parsimonious explanation for these findings is that west Eurasian ancestry entered southern Africa indirectly through eastern Africa.center_img Explore further Citation: Researchers find signs of western Eurasian genes in southern African Khoisan tribes (2014, February 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-western-eurasian-genes-southern-african.html © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Your Minimum Viable Product Is Doomed Without This

first_img By definition, the minimum viable product mindset is restrictive. Your goal in building a minimum viable product is to test your idea as quickly as possible and that means making sacrifices.There’s no room for fancy extras. It’s all about asking the tough questions: What can you get rid of? Can your users live without X or Y?Adopting such a hard-edged attitude poses risk. Early adopters typically love being involved in the building and shaping of a great product from nothing. They’re beta testers, developers and first-wave team members who will forgive shortcomings and even report bugs so you can fix them.But the next wave of users will not be so understanding. They will see news about your product on sites such as Reddit, BuzzFeed and Techli and demand a great experience. Users are particularly harsh with underperforming mobile apps. Research by Compuware in 2012 found that nearly 80 percent of some 3,500 users surveyed said they will retry an app only once or twice if it fails to work the first time.Even the big guys aren’t immune to flops. The Google X search bar design only lasted for one day in 2005. The Motorola Rokr tried to integrate iTunes into a phone for the first time, but it was so buggy that it was almost impossible to use. Amazon’s Fire Phone came equipped with plenty of crowd-pleasing features, but it ultimately did not stack up to today’s top smartphones.Even in the lean, mean world of minimum viable products, balance functionality and design or risk drowning in the crowded marketplace. Here are a few tips for striking the perfect balance between form and function:Related: Got a Great Idea But Not the Time (or Means) to Develop a Product?1. Test your idea with an elevator pitch.If you can’t describe your idea in a one-sentence elevator pitch, it’s not ready to go to market. Being able to clearly communicate your idea to members of your team as they work is imperative to creating a fantastic user experience.Related: Inventor’s Block? Get Unstuck From Your Creative Rut.2. Design with yourself in mind.You are the first user. Walk through your schematics with usability in mind, and assess your experience.You’ll be far more likely to create a user-friendly app if you design it with your preferences in mind.3. Listen to beta testers.Even though you need to be your app’s first user, don’t let your own passion blind you to bugs and usability problems. Listen to your beta testers, and make an effort to incorporate their feedback to ensure your app will appeal to a wide variety of people.Launching a successful minimum viable product depends on striking the right balance between functionality and design. Just look at NailSnaps, the nail-art app that gained a lot of press attention last year: It had two founders who were dedicated to creating the best possible user experience, communicating their vision and listening to early testers to improve the app’s functionality.Just because you’re focused on building an minimum viable product as quickly as possible doesn’t mean you can afford to put out a subpar product. Aim to perfect the features included so that you can launch the product with confidence and deliver a stellar user experience.Related: Delight, the Awesome Product Metric That Rules Them All This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. February 27, 2015 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 3 min read Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more