10 months agoSolskjaer on hefty bonuses at Man Utd

first_imgSolskjaer on hefty bonuses at Man Utdby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United caretaker manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is on hefty bonuses if he can lead the team to success.Solskjaer is on-loan at United from Molde.And the Mirror says according to sources in Norway, Solskjaer will be in the money if he delivers silverware or qualifies for Europe.He is earning £1m, but qualification for either the Champions League or Europa League will net him a seven-figure bonus, while winning a cup will earn a £1m payday.However, should he become the next permanent boss at Old Trafford Molde are set to benefit to the tune of £8m in a managerial transfer fee. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

10 months agoEmery approves Arsenal move for Dalian Yifang winger Carrasco

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Emery approves Arsenal move for Dalian Yifang winger Carrascoby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal boss Unai Emery has approved a move for Dalian Yifang winger Yannick Carrasco.The Belgian winger, formally of Atletico Madrid, has been heavily linked with the Gunners over the past few weeks.The 25-year-old has been playing in the Chinese Super League since 2015, but could now be set for a sensational return to Europe.Foot Mercato says Emery is a big fan of the winger and has given his permission for Arsenal to launch a bid for the Belgium ace.However, Arsenal will have their work cut out as Dalian Yifang are unwilling to part with the man who has scored seven goals in 26 appearances this season. last_img read more

Cincinnati Apparel Company Has Hysterical New Ohio State Shirt Featuring Depressed Michigan Fan

first_imgOhio State Buckeye fans doing the "O-H-I-O" chant.COLUMBUS, OH – SEPTEMBER 27: Ohio State Buckeyes fans cheer on their team against the Minnesota Golden Gophers on September 27, 2008 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)Michigan State fans are not the only ones delerious with joy after Michigan’s last play collapse on Saturday. Ohio State fans aren’t afraid to revel in any loss by the “Team Up North.” “Cincy Shirts,” an Ohio apparel company, printed a new shirt called “The Disappointment Up North” after the game, featuring the depressed Michigan fan that went viral after the Wolverines’ loss. It is pretty perfect.Sorry folks, but we had to! Depressed Michigan Fan shirt now available!Get yours here –> http://goo.gl/Y0zxowPosted by Cincy Shirts on Saturday, October 17, 2015The shirts are available for order at CincyShirts.com. We expect a few Buckeye fans will be interested in them.[CincyShirts.com]last_img read more

EE will continue to market its recently launched T

first_imgEE will continue to market its recently launched TV service independent of BT as part of the telco’s plan to keep the two brands separate “for the foreseeable future”, according to Guillaume Sampic, head of strategy at EE.Speaking at an event organised by technology company Netgem on the fringes of this week’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Sampic said that EE is staying as a standalone proposition and that its fixed-line and mobile offerings will continue to be marketed separately as part of a mobile-centric offering – for the foreseeable future. He said that how the different brands would be positioned within BT’s wider offering was still under discussion.Sampic said that the company is interested in developing live video on-the-go as well as LTE Broadcast and developments such as the ability to live-stream from phones to the set-top box.“Our strategy has been to focus on the middle ground between pay TV and the Freeview-only market. People are downgrading from pay TV and there are also people upgrading from Freeview,” he said.EE has the biggest 4G base in the UK with about 14 million subscribers, out of a total mobile base of 27 million. The company has about one million fixed-line customers. EE launched its TV offering in November 2014.last_img read more

NBC Olympics is due to broadcast 85hours of virtu

first_imgNBC Olympics is due to broadcast 85-hours of virtual reality (VR) content from the Rio 2016 games in partnership with Samsung.NBC Sports app users, with compatible Samsung Galaxy smartphones and Samsung Gear VR headsets, will be able to access the Olympic Broadcasting Services (OBS)-supplied VR coverage.The VR output will include footage from the opening and closing ceremonies, men’s basketball, gymnastics, track and field, beach volleyball, diving, boxing, and fencing.“VR technology carries incredible potential for the sport broadcast industry, offering a truly immersive user experience,” said OBS CEO, Yiannis Exarchos.“Our first test in Lillehammer, together with Samsung, for the Winter Youth Olympic Games was highly successful and we look forward to further exploring this exciting technology with NBC in Rio.”Gary Zenkel, president, NBC Olympics, said: “The world’s greatest sporting event is always a showcase for cutting edge technology, and we’re thrilled to partner with Samsung and OBS to bring our viewers even closer to compelling Olympic action with virtual reality.”Marc Mathieu, chief marketing officer at Samsung Electronics America added that this was a “first-of-its-kind endeavour, connecting fans right to the action in Rio, powered by 360-degree storytelling, virtual reality and our Galaxy phones.”last_img read more

Osteoporosis is not only a womens disease

Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 18 2018UMass Lowell wins $2.6 million grant to study bone health in menOsteoporosis, a bone disease that can result in painful fractures – typically in the back, hip or wrist – is often thought of as a woman’s disease. But men get it too, just usually later in life than women.Segment the population even more and researchers find that Puerto Rican men who live on the U.S. mainland are at much greater risk of thinning bones than previously thought. Researchers at UMass Lowell will assess bone strength and nutrition among men and women in this population in a study that could lead to improvements in treatments for all people who suffer from osteoporosis.The National Institutes of Health has awarded $2.6 million to UMass Lowell researchers to evaluate bone health risks among this population. The research team is led by UMass Lowell Prof. Katherine Tucker and includes assistant professors Kelsey Mangano and Sabrina Noel of the Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences Department.Related StoriesTop four things seniors need to know to have a safe and healthy summerUMN research evaluates impact of multimorbidity on hip fracture probability in older womenPenn study reveals link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosisThis study is among the first of its kind to examine whether differences in bone strength between adults with and without Type 2 diabetes are due in part to compounds called advanced glycation end products (AGEs).Found in many foods and formed when meats are grilled, roasted, seared, fried or baked, AGEs contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.”Studying the relation of AGEs to bone health is novel among humans,” said Tucker, who also leads UMass Lowell’s Center for Population Health. “We expect that the research results will provide insight for developing interventions to prevent bone loss and fracture risk in adults.”The UMass Lowell team will study about 800 people living in the Boston area who are also participants in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study Projects, which is a series of in-depth studies conducted over the past 12 years that has allowed researchers to follow the nutrition and health risk factors of 1,500 members of this population.Participants in the UMass Lowell study will complete a questionnaire, provide blood samples and get bone scans. In addition to the bone mineral density test that measures bone loss, the research team will use a new approach that assesses bone strength.”We know now that the bone density scans that we use today do not capture the full extent of fracture risk,” said Tucker. “In our study, we’ll be using microindentation, a new test that measures bone material strength. Using this new method in combination with the bone mineral density test will give us a better picture of bone health as it relates to nutrition and other health factors.”Early this year, Tucker received a $3.9 million grant from the NIH to study the effect of highly processed foods on dementia in this same population. Source:https://www.uml.edu/ read more

Older adults care about strangers welfare in financial decisionmaking study finds

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 30 2018A recent study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that when it comes to making financial decisions under risk, older adults will regard the financial outcomes of others’ as their own and make choices that they would have selected for themselves.”Citizens in approximately one third of the countries around the world rely heavily on decisions made by older adults who may be government, business or community leaders. It is important to not only understand how these elderly people make decisions for themselves, but also how they make decisions on behalf of others, as their decisions can lead to significant gains or losses,” said team leader Assistant Professor Yu Rongjun, who is from the Department of Psychology at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.The results of this study were reported in the journal Psychology and Aging in September 2018.Closing the knowledge gap in financial decision-makingPeople often need to make financial choices for themselves, and sometimes, on behalf of others. Studies have shown that younger adults take more risks when making financial decisions for others. However, there is a lack of understanding about the decision-making behavior of the elderly.To address this knowledge gap, Asst Prof Yu and his team conducted studies to compare how younger adults and older adults make financial decisions, both for themselves and for others.The NUS study was conducted from 2016 and 2017, and involved 191 Singaporean participants. Among them, 93 were older adults with an average age of 70, while 98 were young adults averaging 23 years old.The participants were asked to complete a series of computerized decision-making tests in which they were assessed based on the choices they made under uncertainties. The research team used computational modeling to analyze two aspects of the participants’ financial decision-making: loss aversion, which is a tendency to weight potential losses more strongly than potential gains; risk-aversion asymmetry, which looks at the tendency to be risk-averse for potential gains and risk-seeking for potential losses.Financial decisions vary with age Related StoriesBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustrySchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchThe results show that when younger adults are making financial decisions on behalf of others, they take more risks even when the decisions put the person they are acting for at a disadvantage. For the seniors, they make similar choices for themselves and when they act for others. Hence, the findings suggest that older adults care more about strangers’ welfare.”Our results demonstrate that decision-makers of different age groups have different motivational goals. The young adults may treat the finances of others’ differently from their own, perhaps regarding them as being less important. On the other hand, the older generation may care more about social harmony and emotional experience, and have less emphasis on material gains,” explained Asst Prof Yu.He further elaborated, “Although we did not manipulate decision-making power and participants simply made choices for strangers in our study, we speculate that similar age-dependent decision-making patterns may also apply to real-life workplace. For instance, a young boss may choose one insurance plan for his employees and another plan for himself. The plan that he picks for others may be more risky and potentially disadvantageous compared to the plan he chooses for himself. On the other hand, an older boss is likely to select the same plan for his staff and himself. The findings of this study resonate with our earlier research which showed older adults are more generous towards strangers.”To deepen their understanding on the financial decision-making process of people from different age groups, Asst Prof Yu and his team will be conducting neuroimaging studies to examine the underlying neural basis of their observations. Source:https://news.nus.edu.sg/press-releases/welfare-in-financial-decision-makinglast_img read more

Five reasons why robots wont take over the world

Robots that can learn like humans Credit: Shutterstock Citation: Five reasons why robots won’t take over the world (2018, April 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-robots-wont-world.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by The Conversation Scientists are known for making dramatic predictions about the future – and sinister robots are once again in the spotlight now that artificial intelligence has become a marketing tool for all sorts of different brands. 1. Human-like handsScientists are far from replicating the complexity of human hands. The hands of robots that are used today in real applications are clumsy. The more sophisticated hands developed in labs are not robust enough and lack the dexterity of human hands. Comparison of a human hand with a robotic one. Credit: Wikimedia, CC BY At the end of World War Two, it was stated that flying cars were just around the corner and that all energy problems would be solved by fusion energy by the end of the 20th century. But decades on, we don’t seem much closer to either of those predictions coming true. So what’s with all this talk – fuelled by the likes of space baron, Elon Musk – about robots taking over the world? Pessimists predict that robots will jeopardise jobs across the globe, and not only in industrial production. They claim robot journalists, robot doctors and robot lawyers will replace human experts. And, as a consequence of a melting down middle class, there will be mass poverty and political instability. Optimists predict a new paradise where all the tedious problems of human relationships can be overcome by having a perfect life with easily replaceable robot partners, which will fulfil our basic needs as well as our deepest longings. And “work” will become an ancient concept. The pessimists, however, can relax and the optimists need to cool their boots. As experts in the field of robotics, we believe that robots will be much more visible in the future, but – at least over the next two decades – they will be clearly recognisable as machines. This is because there is still a long way to go before robots will be able to match a number of fundamental human skills. Here are five reasons why robots aren’t about to take over the world. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. 5. Human reasonNot all of what is technically possible needs to be built. Human reason could decide not to fully develop such robots, because of their potential harm to society. If, in many decades from now, the technical problems mentioned above are overcome so that complex human-like robots could be built, regulations could still prevent misuse.Smooth out the edgesIn our research project, SMOOTH, we design robots that we hope will operate in elderly care institutions by 2022. These robots will be used to solve repetitive tasks involving human and robot interaction, such as transporting laundry and waste, offering water to people or guiding them to the breakfast table. It was necessary to simplify the robots as well as to carefully select the tasks they perform to ensure that they can be commercially viable products within four years.Our approach wasn’t to solve the first three problems of human-like hands, tactile perception and control of manipulation, but to avoid those robotic roadblocks. To address the fourth problem of human and robot interaction, we chose repetitive tasks to reduce complexity, since the expected interactions are – to a certain degree – predictable. Robots are a reality today in industry and they will appear in public spaces in more complex shapes than robot vacuum cleaners. But in the next two decades, robots will not be human-like, even if they might look like humans. Instead they will remain sophisticated machines. So you can stand down from any fear of a robot uprising in the near future. 2. Tactile perceptionThere is no technical match for the magnificent human and animal skin that encompasses a variety of tactile sensors. This perception is required for complex manipulation. Also, the software that processes the input from the sensors in robots is nowhere near as sophisticated as the human brain when it comes to interpretation and reaction to the messages received from the tactile sensors.3. Control of manipulationEven if we had artificial hands comparable to human hands and sophisticated artificial skin, we would still need to be able to design a way to control them to manipulate objects in a human-like way. Human children take years to do this and the learning mechanisms are not understood.4. Human and robot interactionThe interaction between humans is built on well-functioning speech and object recognition systems, as well as other sensors such as smell and taste and tactile sensing. While there has been significant progress in speech and object recognition, today’s systems can still only be used in rather controlled environments when a high degree of performance is required. Explore further read more

Tiny Fighting Worms Make One of the Loudest Sounds in the Ocean

first_img 13 Extremely Weird Animal Feet The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65945-tiny-worms-emit-loud-noise.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?01:09Robots to the Rescue02:27Robotic Arms关闭 Tiny, feisty worms that live off the coast of Japan fight by headbutting each other — and they aren’t quiet about it. During these feuds, the worms emit one of the loudest sounds in the ocean, according to a new study. The source of the underwater hullabaloo is a nearly transparent segmented worm called the Leocratides kimuraorum, which lives inside sponges 279 to 554 feet (85 to 169 meters) deep off the coast of Japan. [The 12 Weirdest Animal Discoveries]Advertisement These wigglies are just a tad more than an inch (29 millimeters) long and have lengthy tentacles and a big mouth (literally). These seemingly quiet creatures revealed their true nature under the spotlight in the lab. A group of researchers used an instrument called a hydrophone to record 15 pops that were emitted from three kimuraorums as they were fighting. In a marine feud researchers dub “mouth-fighting,” the worms approached each other headfirst with their mouths open. During such encounters, the worms’ pharynx muscles expand rapidly, creating a cavitation bubble that collapses and produces a loud “pop” while the worms launch into each other. The researchers found that these pops can reach 157 decibels in the water (which is a different measurement than decibels in the air). From right next to the water tank, the pops sounded like humans snapping their fingers, lead author Goto Ryutaro, an assitant professor at Kyoto University told Live Science. “Though they probably sound louder if you hear them in the water.” The worms are as loud as snapping shrimps, which are one of the biggest noisemakers in the ocean, the authors wrote. What’s more, they found that these worms did not make any noise when simply disturbed, they only did so when they were fighting. They “may use mouth-fighting to defend territory or living chambers from other worms,” the authors wrote July 8 in the journal Current Biology. “A loud pop may be a byproduct of the rapid mouth attack, but it may also aid intraspecific communication.” A loud noise could somehow determine the victor of the fight or even reveal the whereabouts of nearby worms, they wrote. Originally published on Live Science. Strange Love: 10 Animals with Truly Weird Courtship Ritualslast_img read more