a month agoMan Utd defender Axel Tuanzebe wants more Cup action

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd defender Axel Tuanzebe wants more Cup actionby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United defender Axel Tuanzebe hopes to keep his place for the next round of the Carabao Cup.Tuazebe captained United to their shootout win over Rochdale this week.United travel to Chelsea for the fourth round next month in an all-Premier League blockbuster. “These are the kind of games you want to be playing,” said Tuanzebe. “People dismiss the Carabao Cup and say it is a nothing kind of trophy. But you respect the teams who are in it and you respect the competition. Chelsea will be a big game and we want to win it and march on.” last_img

8 days agoMan Utd teenager Williams signs new contract

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Man Utd teenager Williams signs new contractby Freddie Taylor8 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United have tied down Brandon Williams to a new contract.The promising teenager was impressive on debut in the Europa League draw with AZ Alkmaar last month.The new deal will keep him at United until June 2022, with the option to extend for a further year.Speaking after the AZ result, manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was full of praise for the young fullback.”You won’t see a better full debut from a full back anywhere,” the Red Devils coach said.”The boy is just going to improve and improve. He’s got the right mentality. I’m very pleased for him.” last_img

2 days agoArsenal legend Wright has Nketiah advice for Bielsa

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Arsenal legend Wright has Nketiah advice for Bielsaby Paul Vegas2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal legend Ian Wright has lead the chorus of supporters asking for Eddie Nketiah to start Leeds’ next match.The 20-year-old scored his third goal of the season to rescue a point for the Whites in Tuesday’s 1-1 draw with Preston.It was Nketiah’s 11th substitute appearance, having not been started once by Marcelo Bielsa.And Gunners legend Ian Wright, who has given Nketiah advice this season, has demanded Bielsa change his starting line-up.Wright wrote simply on Twitter: “Start him.”Both Leeds and Arsenal supporters echoed the statement across social media. last_img

Rep Sheppard Grants vital for county level veteran services

first_img State Rep. Jason Sheppard of Temperance today voted with his House colleagues to approve a measure encouraging Michigan counties to establish and maintain veteran service offices through a new grant program.The legislation, which Sheppard co-sponsored, provides funding to each county with a veteran service office that satisfies pre-approved requirements.  The funding includes a base amount with the possibility of an additional amount based on the number of veterans in the county. To continue receiving the grant, an established county veteran service office must meet benchmarks for staff performance and reporting while maintaining the previous year’s funding level.Currently, there are 11 Michigan counties without a veteran service office. This could be due to a lack of funding, a county partnering with a neighboring county or the number of veterans in the area. A Veteran Service Officer (VSO) may only be available for a few hours each month at a single location depending on the county.“This legislation will provide much needed resources for our valuable service offices,” Sheppard said.  “The sacrifices made by our veterans are more than most of us will ever face.  I’m proud to support this bill and see it as a way to support those who fought for all of us.”House Bill 5536 now moves to the Senate for consideration.##### 14Mar Rep. Sheppard: Grants vital for county level veteran services Categories: Sheppard Newslast_img read more

The news is just out that a company called Red Eag

first_imgThe news is just out that a company called Red Eagle Mining (RD.V) has received the final permit it needs to build its San Ramon Gold Mine in Colombia. We don’t own Red Eagle shares, but this very good news is important to us, because there has been increasing skepticism of Colombia as a mining jurisdiction in recent years. Decades of war and terrorism had pretty much halted modern exploration in Colombia, so when that wound down in the early 2000s, there was an exploration boom. Many stocks soared simply on the basis of acquiring properties to spend money on in the country. Then reality set in, progress was slow, the market turned down, and environmental opposition to mining in the country ramped up. The skepticism was not unreasonable. That makes it all the more important that Red Eagle’s final license was granted in full, without conditions. This shows that Colombia is indeed open to responsible mining, and that’s just what we needed to know regarding our own investments in the country.last_img read more

In This Issue Currencies are rallying VS the

first_imgIn This Issue. * Currencies are rallying VS the dollar. * Iron ore prices rally for two days. * China talks more RRR cuts. * Martin Weiss talks BRICS! And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts. Let The Dovish Talk Begin. Good day.. And a Wonderful Wednesday to you! Well, no new baby news, no Luke and Lara updates, and the Cardinals broke the bats out last night. That’s about it, thank you and have a great day!   Well, there’s something else going on today, that everyone, but me, is all lathered up about, and that’s the end of the FOMC Meeting, which will have a statement by Janet Yellen in which every word, and the tone in which she said the word will be scrutinized by the markets. I usually don’t get all that “into” what they say, it’s what they do that drives me crazy. But in the end, I believe the talk will be dovish, as the Fed begins to grease the tracks for the no-move in June. Well, yesterday was quite the day for the currencies, and even Gold got into the banging on the dollar as the day went along. But that was yesterday. Overnight we’ve seen some profit taking, as the currencies have had quite a run on the dollar lately. The Aussie dollar (A$) traded over 80-cents yesterday, just a couple of weeks ago, the A$ was trading below 76-cents. The Canadian dollar / loonie a couple of weeks ago was trading with a 79-cent handle, and yesterday the loonie reached 83-cents..  So those are just a couple of examples of the currency moves, before of the past couple of weeks, before last night’s profit taking. The British pound sterling and the euro are two currencies that are adding to their gains the past couple of weeks.  But the best performer overnight is the Swedish krona, and this rally came about because the Riksbank left rates unchanged, when a rate cut was all but considered to be a done deal. You may recall that Sweden already has negative rates -.25%, but the Riksbank decided against digging the hole deeper. All the short krona trades based on the thought that a deeper hole would be dug with negative rates, had to be reversed, and that has led to a huge move for the krona overnight. We’ll get two Central Bank decisions tonight. One from the Brazilian Central Bank (BCB) and the other from the Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ).  I suspect that the BCB will hike rates one more time to close out this rate hike cycle and bring their internal rate to 13%… While the markets and economists are on the fence about what the RBNZ will do at their OCR Review this evening. OCR is the Official Cash Review, where interest rates will be discussed. I think the RBNZ is going to grease the tracks for what they feel is needed, a rate cut  at a future meeting. If they do, kiwi should take cover, for the selling might be harsh. The Chinese renminbi / yuan was allowed to appreciate again last night, and the renminbi is now trading below 6.12 spot. The renminbi has been bucking the trend of currencies getting weaker VS the dollar, by holding Steady Eddie, and when it came time to appreciate with the other currencies, it did so. I think this is a scenario we can count on going forward, as the Chinese want to show the IMF that the currency can be stable. I was directed to a report that was filed on Monday by a JC Collins titled: When Will China End The Dollar Peg? And it appeared on the website: www.thedailycoin.org    And while technically, it’s not correct, the renminbi / yuan is not pegged directly to the dollar, but instead to a basket of currencies of which the dollar is a part of, the thought here is about dropping the peg to the basket, although the writer refers to the basket as the “dollar” throughout the article. And in the article was something that I had not thought of. So, let me set this up for you.  I’ve told you for over a month now that China was going to make a presentation to the IMF to get the renminbi / yuan included in the Special Drawing Rights (SDRs ) that the IMF uses, that includes: dollars, euro, yen and pounds. I’ve already talked about how at this presentation the Chinese might actually disclose the true balance of their Gold reserves. But in addition to that. I was not aware that the IMF is not going to allow the renminbi to be included in SDRs if it is still pegged to the basket of currencies.  So, we could actually see the renminbi float by the end of next month! WOW! And all those naysayers out there said it would never be done! Well, if this is all on the up and up, we could well see the managed currency peg dropped, and the renminbi float. Of course that would be a managed float, the Peoples Bank of China (PBOC) would still have a lot of say in the direction of the currency, but the currency could trade outside of the current bands it is required to stay within. That would inject volatility into the currency, something we’ve never really seen, although the PBOC attempted to make the renminbi more volatile last year. Just another step, although this would be a tall step and not the baby steps the Chinese have been taking since 2008 to remove the dollar as the reserve currency, and push their currency as the replacement to the dollar. Are you ready? This is going to get really exciting..  And it’s moving faster than I imagined. Gold added to its gains from the previous day yesterday, but is down $6 this morning but still above $1,200. Our metals guru, Tim Smith, sent me a link to an article on the web that explains the $22 gain in Gold on Monday. I have it here in case you want to read the whole article. http://www.cnbc.com/id/102623775 But basically, the article says the move was caused by intrigue surrounding a deal between Venezuela and Citigroup to swap $1 Billion in cash for part of the country’s Gold reserves. You know what I say to that?  I say. That’s why you have Gold! As insurance! And Venezuela , seeing their revenues falling from the Oil price shock this past year, needed some cash, so they tapped their insurance. As I told you yesterday morning, there wasn’t much data to sift through on our Tom Terrific Tuesday, but there were two data prints to look at, and so let’s go look at them!  First up was Consumer Confidence, and here the markets received a mild shock from the print, as The Consumer Confidence Index fell 6.2 points to 95.2 in April. Not that this data is at the top of everyone’s list of data the moves markets, it didn’t help the dollar any, as the green/peachback was already doing the rope-a-dope.  Next up was the S&P/ CaseShiller Home Price Index for February and here this data showed us that home prices in their 20-city home price index, rose 4.22% in February from January, and that the Home Prices rose at a faster pace.  Notice we didn’t hear anyone pull out the “bad weather” card here?  So, Home Prices are going up. good for them! Today’s U.S. Cupboard is going to give us the first print of 1st QTR GDP. Which I’ve already told you will be 1% after all revisions. Well, that’s what I think, I can’t say that it will be 1% for certain, but at this point, I’m thinking that 1% might be conservative!  And then of course the FOMC meeting this afternoon will break up after two days of “meetings”. I truly think that IF the Fed members are truly honest with themselves, they’ll admit that the economy is having problems, and this is not the time for a rate hike. To recap.  Today, it will be all about the end of the FOMC Meeting, and what Janet Yellen is going to say afterward. The currencies had their way with the dollar yesterday, and today we’re seeing some profit taking in a few currencies that have run far and fast. And then there are those that are adding to their gains, like the pound and euro. Swedish krona is the best performer overnight on the news that the Riksbank left rates unchanged, when everyone thought they would dig their negative rates hole deeper. And it is being reported that Venezuela has to tap their insurance (Gold) to replace lost revenue from the oil price shock. For What it’s Worth. The Big Boss, Frank Trotter, will from time to time send me links to articles on the German News site: Spiegel Online. And so I decided to go there myself yesterday, and when I did I found something that caught my eye, for I had seen this somewhere before, and then it hit me, that Ed Steer had highlighted the article in his letter! Great minds must think alike, eh? HA!  So, anyway, here’s a snippet or two from the article that can be read top to bottom by clicking here: http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/greek-president-pavlopoulos-rules-out-possibility-of-euro-exit-a-1030809.html Greek President Promises Repayment Of All Debt.  That’s the title of the article, and here are your snippets. “Time is running out for Greece and its international creditors. If an agreement isn’t found by June, the country will face insolvency. The new Greek president, Prokopis Pavlopoulos, has now told SPIEGEL ONLINE his views on the conflict: He rules out the possibility of a Grexit and promises that all the loans made to Greece will be paid back, but he is also critical of past austerity programs. “Some of the measures imposed on us go beyond E.U. law,” Pavlopoulos said to SPIEGEL ONLINE at his official residence in Athens. “We want to be equal members of Europe.” Among other things, the law professor feels that international lenders’ criticisms of the minimum wage and other labor rights in his country are problematic. Pavlopoulos pointed out that in Germany, too, there is a minimum standard of living. “We are not asking for anything more than for the Greek people to enjoy what Germany’s Constitutional Court considers as an established social right for the German people,” Pavlopoulos said. He also claimed that parts of the austerity programs “were not at all growth friendly, but rather would lead the Greek economy to a recessionary course.” Chuck again. You begin to feel bad for the guy right? Well, don’t!  This is what happens when you live beyond your means for years. It happens to individuals, families, cities, states, and Governments. And the realization is hell. Before I go to the Big Finish I wanted to apologize for a couple of things. 1. For not having a FWIW section the last two days. I just couldn’t find anything worth talking about. and 2. For my math lately.  The other day I said El Salvador received millions when it should have said billions for their Gold sales. I think I did that last week too with mixing millions for billions or vice versa. I don’t do any of that on purpose to make sure you’re checking me, I’m not that smart!  Currencies today 4/29/15. American Style: A$ .7990, kiwi .7695, C$ .8295, euro 1.0995, sterling 1.5365, Swiss $1.0470,  . European Style: rand 11.8665, krone 7.6245, SEK 8.4050, forint 274.65, zloty 3.6485, koruna 24.9325, RUB 51.51, yen 119.25, sing 1.3225, HKD 7.7505, INR 63.32, China 6.1169, pesos 15.27, BRL 2.9360, Dollar Index 95.97, Oil $56.73, 10-year 2.00%, Silver 16.48, Platinum $1,155.13, Palladium $776.32, and Gold. $1,207.41 That’s it for today. Well, my beloved Cardinals broke out the bats last night, which was a good thing because the other team was hitting the ball too! Well, this is day 5 of my latest home alone arrangement, and all’s well, other than this darn cold, that keeps waking me up at night. I did get a visitor last evening, my good friend Duane stopped by to see how I was doing, and then neighbor Paul came over and before long we were sitting outside talking trees, owls, hawks, and listening to the Cardinals on the radio. I knew it wouldn’t last long once the sun went down, so I didn’t fire up the outside TV, just opted for the old reliable radio. Old school.  Chuck, Rick, Duane, Paul and Kevin, sitting out back listening to the game on the little transistor radio I had. Good memories. On this day in 1945. The German Army in Italy surrenders unconditionally to the Allied Troops. So there you go!  And on this day, the World War II monument opened in Washington D.C.   So, there’s a little history for you today, this April 29th..  Ok, time to get out of your hair for today, so please go out and have a Wonderful Wednesday! Chuck Butler Managing Director EverBank Global Marketslast_img read more

Food scientists at the University of Massachussett

first_imgFood scientists at the University of Massachussetts Amherst have come up with a technique they say could make it a lot easier to avoid food poisoning.The main piece of equipment? Your smartphone.Currently, to identify the bacteria that can get you sick, like E. coli or salmonella, food scientists often use DNA testing.They obtain samples from, say, raw spinach or chicken skin, by rinsing the food and collecting a tiny bit of bacteria from the water. Then they let that bacteria multiply over 24 hours to get a big enough sample.All this takes time and specialized equipment.”Bacteria can be in the very, very low numbers, and cause illness,” said UMass microbiologist Lynne McLandsborough. “So that detection needs to detect low numbers.”McLandsborough is working with UMass food science professor Lili He on what they say is a much simpler — and more accessible — tool to detect harmful bacteria in food: a smartphone app that uses a $30 microscope attachment.The device works in conjunction with a chemically-coated chip that binds to bacteria, even in tiny amounts.Dipping the chip into contaminated water for half an hour will reveal bacteria, as Adam Salhaney, an undergraduate in He’s lab, demonstrated.”You can take this … microscope attachment for any smart phone,” Salhaney said, gripping the iPhone 7 they use as a prototype, “and you can clip it right onto the camera.”After pointing the microscope at a gold chip they’d coated with salmonella, Salhaney enlarged an image with a number of black dots set against the gold background of the chip. The dots were bacteria.Since his hand was shaking a bit, Salhaney had to work to get the image into focus. “But I think the average consumer will be able to figure it out without much trouble,” he said.They hope consumers will eventually buy the testing kit for their own kitchens. It could also prove useful after natural disasters to test drinking water.The UMass scientists say several food-processing companies have contacted them since the research went public last month. But it’s still several years away from market.”Right now, this is really preliminary,” said McLandsborough. “We can detect bacteria with the iPhone, but we don’t know if they’re pathogenic — if they’re harmful bacteria or good bacteria.”She said they’re trying to develop a technique that will identify the exact type of bacteria.In the meantime, for her own food safety, McLandsborough avoids raw sprouts and raw oysters, and cooks her hamburgers to medium.A version of this story first appeared on New England Public Radio, where Karen Brown is a senior reporter. Copyright 2018 New England Public Radio. To see more, visit New England Public Radio.last_img read more

Tens of thousands of fitness for work benefit cl

first_imgTens of thousands of “fitness for work” benefit claims could have been decided by civil servants on evidence from assessment reports that should have been rejected because their quality was “unacceptable”, government figures suggest.The concerns about the way Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) decision-makers have decided employment and support allowance (ESA) claims follow last week’s revelations about similar concerns with personal independence payment (PIP) claims.They are based on figures provided by the minister for disabled people, Sarah Newton (pictured), to Labour MP Grahame Morris.The figures* show that the proportion of work capability assessment (WCA) reports sent back to DWP contractor Maximus** because they were found to be of “unacceptable” quality – following audits of small samples of the reports – was as much as 100 times greater than the proportion sent back by DWP decision-makers when making day-to-day decisions on ESA claims.This suggests that DWP decision-makers are frequently deciding ESA claims based on “unacceptable” reports instead of sending them back to Maximus assessors to “rework”.With Newton’s figures also showing that Maximus carried out more than one million WCAs and other assessments in 2016-17, and more than 1.1 million in 2017-18 – when only 625 reports were sent back by DWP to Maximus to be reworked because they were “unacceptable” – this suggests that tens of thousands of claims could have been affected every year.DWP and Maximus yesterday (Wednesday) both denied that this was what the figures showed, with Maximus insisting that it was “inaccurate and misleading” to draw such a conclusion.But disabled activists and researchers are deeply concerned by the figures and believe they are further evidence of the unfairness of the disability benefit assessment system, and of how tens of thousands of disabled people have been wrongly denied support through the social security system.Maximus took over the WCA contract from Atos in March 2015.The figures provided by Newton show that, in 2015-16, just 0.06 per cent of assessment reports were returned by DWP to Maximus for reworking because they were of “unacceptable” quality.In 2016-17 this was 0.066 per cent (still far fewer than one in a thousand) and in 2017-18 it was just 0.056 per cent.But when senior Maximus executives appeared before the Commons work and pensions committee in December, they told MPs that the audit process showed that the proportion of “C-grade” reports – those deemed “unacceptable” by auditors – was currently 7.3 per cent, more than 100 times higher.In subsequent written evidence to the committee, Maximus told the MPs that C-grade reports were those “considered not to have met expected standards for a variety of reasons”, whereas A and B grade reports were those that were “fit for purpose” and where “a decision could be made on the case” by DWP.Last week, DNS heard from a DWP civil servant who works on the PIP “frontline”, who said that DWP case managers have strict targets for the number of PIP claims they need to process every day, are quizzed by their superiors if they miss their weekly targets and are “instructed to act on the assessor’s report, given that they are the medical experts”.This week, DNS has heard from a former DWP civil servant who worked on ESA and said she and her colleagues were also “strongly discouraged from sending back reports we felt needed to be reworked”.She said: “I was told to leave it, continue with the decision.“I was told there is probably something we don’t know about that the assessor did… so to leave it, no need to return it.”Anita Bellows, a Disabled People Against Cuts researcher, said DWP again needed to explain the discrepancies in its statistics.She said: “While the figures for reports deemed unacceptable and therefore needing ‘rework’ provided by disability assessors are low, the reports audited paint a different picture, one of disability assessors producing a huge number of unacceptable reports.“But the discrepancies show something else. Statistics on the number of unacceptable reports are being manipulated and kept artificially low.“It is unthinkable that the DWP did not notice these discrepancies. And this begs the question: how many claimants had their claim decided based on unacceptable reports?”A DWP spokeswoman denied yesterday that the figures produced by the minister showed that civil servants had for years been making ESA claim decisions on the basis of reports of an “unacceptable” quality.She said: “In order to provide the best possible service to our customers, rather than resending reports for re-work our decision-makers tend to call the health provider’s customer service desk to discuss and resolve problems they identify.“Returning assessment reports for re-work extends the length of time taken to make a decision and delays payment to our customers of the benefit rate to which they are entitled.“By discussing the case directly and immediately, issues can be solved quickly. However, in a minority of cases, this is not possible and the report needs to be returned for re-work as per our procedures.”But campaigner John Slater, whose freedom of information work has previously produced crucial data about the DWP’s disability benefit assessment contracts, said: “It’s deeply worrying that the DWP admitted decisions are sometimes made on the basis of poor medical reports plus telephone calls with the health provider’s customer service desk.“The flawed reports are not re-worked and there is every chance that no record of what is said during these telephone calls will be added to the claimant’s file.”He said this could also mean that if the claimant requested a copy of their assessment report it might not be an accurate record of the information upon which the decision was based, which he said had “clear implications for the appeals process”.A Maximus spokesman said that the latest figures from the audit process – through which DWP checks on more than 700 assessment reports a month – showed it was now meeting its target of less than five per cent of these being given a C-grade.Maximus has also met its target of more than 70 per cent of assessment reports securing an A-grade in every month since the start of the contract, he said.The Maximus spokesman said: “Since we took over the contract in March 2015, we have delivered year-on-year improvements across the service.“We have met or exceeded all of our quality targets since January 2018.“Separately, we have always exceeded the DWP’s target that over 99.5 per cent of reports comply with the department’s standards, enabling them to make a decision on ESA eligibility.“These two measures are distinct and it is inaccurate and misleading to conflate them.”*The vast majority of these assessments were WCAs but Maximus also carries out assessments for other disability benefits, including disability living allowance for under-16s and industrial injuries disablement benefit **Referred to in Newton’s answer as CHDA (the Centre for Health and Disability Assessments), which is part of Maximuslast_img read more

Johnson Johnson to Cut 3000 jobs in Medical Devices Division

first_img –shares Johnson & Johnson to Cut 3,000 jobs in Medical Devices Division Healthcare conglomerate Johnson & Johnson said it would cut about 3,000 jobs within its medical devices division, or between 4 percent and 6 percent of the unit’s global workforce, over the next two years.The company said on Tuesday that it expected to record pre-tax restructuring charges of $2 billion to $2.4 billion in connection with these plans, of which about $600 million will be recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.Leerink analysts said the announcement meant that an acquisition was still on the cards for J&J, given that it had about $37 billion in cash as of the end of the third quarter.”We continue to believe J&J is an active acquirer with a focus likely heavily weighted toward it’s lagging Medical Devices business…it’s a matter of when, not if, J&J does a deal”, they wrote in a note.J&J also reiterated its full-year 2015 forecast, and said the restructuring in the devices business move would not impact the $10 billion share repurchase program.The company said the restructuring would affect its orthopaedics, surgery and cardiovascular businesses within the larger medical devices unit.The consumer medical devices, vision care and diabetes care, part of the same division, would not be affected, J&J said.The restructuring is expected to result in annualized pre-tax cost savings of $800 million to $1 billion, J&J said. Most of these savings are expected by the end of 2018, including about $200 million in 2016.New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J currently employs about 60,000 within its medical devices unit, part of a global workforce of about 127,000.The Band-Aid maker is expected to report its fourth quarter results on Jan. 26.The company’s shares rose about 1 percent to $98.25 in premarket trading.(Reporting by Natalie Grover in Bengaluru; Editing by Ted Kerr, Robin Paxton and Savio D’Souza) Layoffs Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Image credit: Reuters | Rick Wilking Reuters center_img 2 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Next Article January 19, 2016 Register Now » Add to Queuelast_img read more

More Than 130000 People Have Already PreOrdered Teslas 35000Model 3

first_imgTesla 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List –shares Reuters Next Article April 1, 2016 Image credit: Reuters | Tesla Motors Handout via Reuters Tesla 3 min read More Than 130,000 People Have Already Pre-Ordered Tesla’s $35,000-Model 3 This story originally appeared on Reuters Tesla Motors gave a sneak preview Thursday of its Model 3 sedan, saying more than 130,000 people had ordered the car, even though it is more than a year away from production.Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk unveiled a prototype of the Model 3 in Hawthorne, Calif., outside Los Angeles to hundreds of Tesla owners and the media, saying the vehicle will go into production in 2017 at a starting price of $35,000.The Model 3 is critical to the Silicon Valley automaker’s growth plans and to sustaining its lofty stock price. Tesla shares have jumped in recent days in anticipation of the Model 3 launch.The Model 3 will enter a crowded field of luxury and electric cars that includes gasoline-fueled models such as the Audi A4 and BMW 3-Series, and electric models such as the forthcoming Chevrolet Bolt EV from General Motors Co.”Do you want to see the car?” teased Musk, to screams from the audience in the hangar-sized facility inside a Tesla design center. “We don’t have it for you tonight — just kidding!”Three Model 3s were driven onstage. The compact sleek four-door car with no grille features a roof that is a panoramic pane of glass from front to back.Musk said that 115,000 pre-orders had already been taken on Thursday alone for the car. Within a half hour, that number reached 137,600 in a rolling scroll projected onto a screen.Fans had camped out overnight, queueing outside Tesla stores across California to put down deposits on the car in scenes reminiscent of the launch of Apple Inc. products.The Model 3 is crucial for Tesla to reach its goal of selling 500,000 cars per year by 2020. The success of Tesla’s Gigafactory, its battery factory near completion in Nevada, is also contingent on the Model 3.Tesla says scale from the massive facility will cut the cost of its battery pack by 30 percent to enable the lower-priced vehicle.High expectations ahead of the unveiling have restored Tesla’s shares to around the $230-mark, recovering from a year low of $141.05 in February after analysts cut price targets and revenue expectations.”It is important to the industry because it will signal whether or not Tesla Motors is a major threat to the status quo or just another wannabe car company with a fleeting chance for long-term success,” said Kelley Blue Book’s Jack Nerad.GM is on track to beat Tesla to the market with its Chevrolet Bolt electric car, which GM says will launch late this year, offering about 200 miles of electric driving range and a starting price of around $35,000.A new generation of Nissan Motor Co’s Leaf electric car is also expected to offer more driving range at a similar price.The Model 3 and others in the new generation of electric vehicles face challenges from low gasoline prices, high battery costs and uncertain investment in recharging infrastructure.Through the first two months of this year, sales of all-electric and hybrid vehicles are down nearly 9 percent to 60,384 vehicles, data from trade group the Electric Drive Transportation Association shows.That’s fewer hybrid and battery electric vehicles sold in two months than Ford sold of its F-series large pickup trucks in February alone.Several short-term concerns, such as that Model 3 production will be delayed, and the slow ramp of the Model X will continue, go hand-in-hand with skeptics’ longer-term worries that the unprofitable company will continue to bleed cash.In February, Tesla said it would start generating positive cash flow this month.(Reporting by Alexandria Sage and Joe White; Editing by Clarence Fernandez) The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queue Apply Now »last_img read more

China Bans Autonomous Car Testing for Now

first_img –shares Don Reisinger Self-Driving Cars This story originally appeared on PCMag Contributing Writer July 21, 2016 Image credit: PC Mag Next Article China is putting the brakes on self-driving car testing.The country’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology drafted new regulations on self-driving car testing in the country, but until they’re approved, the government has warned companies not to try it out, according to Bloomberg, which obtained a copy of the draft.Self-driving cars are quickly becoming a hot commodity in the auto world as companies from Google to Mercedes-Benz try out the technology in the US, Europe and elsewhere. There’s no timeline on when China might approve its rules, Bloomberg says, but as auto makers eye autonomous car rollouts in the next decade, time is of the essence if China wants to keep up.Major car makers like BMW have already made plans to test self-driving cars in China. In April, Volvo said it would begin negotiations with Chinese cities that want to test Volvo’s autonomous cars using local drivers. The company wanted to use up to 100 cars to see how they work in everyday road conditions.In December, China’s Baidu also announced that its self-driving car — a modified BMW 3 Series — successfully completed testing on mixed roads under various environmental conditions. The 19-mile test drive route began at Baidu’s Beijing headquarters and covered the G7 highway, Fifth Ring Road and Olympic Park, before looping back to the starting point.In the US, semi-autonomous car technology has come under fire following the fatal accident of a Tesla Model S in Autopilot mode. Tesla has denied any wrongdoing, reiterating that Autopilot is semi- and not fully autonomous and promising an upgrade soon, but regulators are investigating. 2 min read China Bans Autonomous Car Testing (for Now) The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Add to Queue Apply Now »last_img read more

Osteoporosis is not only a womens disease

Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 18 2018UMass Lowell wins $2.6 million grant to study bone health in menOsteoporosis, a bone disease that can result in painful fractures – typically in the back, hip or wrist – is often thought of as a woman’s disease. But men get it too, just usually later in life than women.Segment the population even more and researchers find that Puerto Rican men who live on the U.S. mainland are at much greater risk of thinning bones than previously thought. Researchers at UMass Lowell will assess bone strength and nutrition among men and women in this population in a study that could lead to improvements in treatments for all people who suffer from osteoporosis.The National Institutes of Health has awarded $2.6 million to UMass Lowell researchers to evaluate bone health risks among this population. The research team is led by UMass Lowell Prof. Katherine Tucker and includes assistant professors Kelsey Mangano and Sabrina Noel of the Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences Department.Related StoriesTop four things seniors need to know to have a safe and healthy summerUMN research evaluates impact of multimorbidity on hip fracture probability in older womenPenn study reveals link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosisThis study is among the first of its kind to examine whether differences in bone strength between adults with and without Type 2 diabetes are due in part to compounds called advanced glycation end products (AGEs).Found in many foods and formed when meats are grilled, roasted, seared, fried or baked, AGEs contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.”Studying the relation of AGEs to bone health is novel among humans,” said Tucker, who also leads UMass Lowell’s Center for Population Health. “We expect that the research results will provide insight for developing interventions to prevent bone loss and fracture risk in adults.”The UMass Lowell team will study about 800 people living in the Boston area who are also participants in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study Projects, which is a series of in-depth studies conducted over the past 12 years that has allowed researchers to follow the nutrition and health risk factors of 1,500 members of this population.Participants in the UMass Lowell study will complete a questionnaire, provide blood samples and get bone scans. In addition to the bone mineral density test that measures bone loss, the research team will use a new approach that assesses bone strength.”We know now that the bone density scans that we use today do not capture the full extent of fracture risk,” said Tucker. “In our study, we’ll be using microindentation, a new test that measures bone material strength. Using this new method in combination with the bone mineral density test will give us a better picture of bone health as it relates to nutrition and other health factors.”Early this year, Tucker received a $3.9 million grant from the NIH to study the effect of highly processed foods on dementia in this same population. Source:https://www.uml.edu/ read more

Study highlights disparity in providing mental health services across EU countries

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 29 2019Access to inpatient care for young people with mental health issues varies significantly across Europe, with mental health services providing up to fifty times more beds depending upon the country you live in.The UK is 18thout of 28 countries in Europe for the number of inpatient beds available per 100,000 young people, despite having the largest number of services dedicated to child and adolescent mental health.Research led by Professor Swaran Singh of Warwick Medical School has highlighted the disparity in mental health service provision across the twenty-eight EU countries. Researchers are calling for better national policies from EU countries that standardize services and improve access to mental health services for children and adolescents experiencing mental illness.The figures are among findings to be presented at an event on 29 April to mark the completion of the five-year MILESTONE project led by the University of Warwick and involving research teams in 7 other countries, which aims to improve transitions for young people from child (CAMHS) to adult mental health services across Europe.It is the first comprehensive evaluation of children’s mental health services in Europe and examines young people’s experiences in transitioning to adult mental health services for the first time.As part of the project, which received 6 million euro in funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme, researchers conducted a survey of CAMHS provision in all twenty-eight countries in the EU. The survey highlighted that the number of pediatric beds available, a measure of the capacity of those services, varied significantly country to country. While Sweden had the least with 1.2 beds per 100,000 young people, Germany had the most with 64 beds per 100,000 young people – over fifty times as many.It has highlighted the lack of consistency in the management of children and young people with mental health issues across Europe with significant variations in how services are delivered. For example, the UK has a relatively low 9.4 beds per 100,000 young people, but has by far the largest number of public CAMHS (939).Mental health issues are on the rise in young people.One in ten 5 to 16 year-olds are affected by a mental health issue and 50% of mental health problems are established by the age of 14.For most young people, reaching the milestone birthday that marks the start of adulthood is a celebratory affair. However, for those relying on the support of CAMHS it can mean uncertainty and possibly the loss of the support that has helped them so far. In the majority of European countries, when service users reach a certain age – 18 in the UK, for example – they are no longer eligible to use children’s services and are instead moved to adult services.Related StoriesInternational study aims to more accurately describe mental health disordersState lawmakers eye federal dollars to boost mental health counseling by peersOnline training program helps managers to support employees’ mental health needsThis transition has little clarity. The findings indicate that while a number of young people move on to adult mental health services with minimal disruption, a large proportion are discharged without guidance on how to continue their support, have to take on the burden of convincing adult services to accept them, experiencing long waiting times for appointments and having to repeatedly explain their problems to different services.Warwick Medical School’s Professor Swaran Singh, Project Coordinator for the MILESTONE project, said: “The MILESTONE project is a genuine milestone in youth mental health research since for the first time it shows the nature and magnitude of the problem of transition from child to adult mental health services, something that has been often discussed but never quantified and understood in such a detailed and nuanced manner. We tried one way of bridging the transition divide through our managed transition trial. There may be other ways and perhaps the best way forward is to try a few models and test them for long term outcomes in young people with emerging mental health problems.”With around a tenth of young people likely to experience mental health issues, it’s a matter of concern that the approach to child mental health varies so dramatically across Europe. Our youth deserve better mental health care than they currently receive.”Findings from the MILESTONE project will be presented at a public dissemination event on 29 April at Church House, Westminster. Attendees will get to hear from young people and sector-leading UK and international speakers, gain a better understanding of wider issues linked with transition and discuss the next steps in shaping policy, service provision and research. It will also feature the premiere of a new short film ‘I am the Loneliness of 4am’, which captures how young people feel when they face problems accessing care at the transition boundary.Source: https://warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/inpatient_care_forlast_img read more

Five reasons why robots wont take over the world

Robots that can learn like humans Credit: Shutterstock Citation: Five reasons why robots won’t take over the world (2018, April 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-robots-wont-world.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by The Conversation Scientists are known for making dramatic predictions about the future – and sinister robots are once again in the spotlight now that artificial intelligence has become a marketing tool for all sorts of different brands. 1. Human-like handsScientists are far from replicating the complexity of human hands. The hands of robots that are used today in real applications are clumsy. The more sophisticated hands developed in labs are not robust enough and lack the dexterity of human hands. Comparison of a human hand with a robotic one. Credit: Wikimedia, CC BY At the end of World War Two, it was stated that flying cars were just around the corner and that all energy problems would be solved by fusion energy by the end of the 20th century. But decades on, we don’t seem much closer to either of those predictions coming true. So what’s with all this talk – fuelled by the likes of space baron, Elon Musk – about robots taking over the world? Pessimists predict that robots will jeopardise jobs across the globe, and not only in industrial production. They claim robot journalists, robot doctors and robot lawyers will replace human experts. And, as a consequence of a melting down middle class, there will be mass poverty and political instability. Optimists predict a new paradise where all the tedious problems of human relationships can be overcome by having a perfect life with easily replaceable robot partners, which will fulfil our basic needs as well as our deepest longings. And “work” will become an ancient concept. The pessimists, however, can relax and the optimists need to cool their boots. As experts in the field of robotics, we believe that robots will be much more visible in the future, but – at least over the next two decades – they will be clearly recognisable as machines. This is because there is still a long way to go before robots will be able to match a number of fundamental human skills. Here are five reasons why robots aren’t about to take over the world. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. 5. Human reasonNot all of what is technically possible needs to be built. Human reason could decide not to fully develop such robots, because of their potential harm to society. If, in many decades from now, the technical problems mentioned above are overcome so that complex human-like robots could be built, regulations could still prevent misuse.Smooth out the edgesIn our research project, SMOOTH, we design robots that we hope will operate in elderly care institutions by 2022. These robots will be used to solve repetitive tasks involving human and robot interaction, such as transporting laundry and waste, offering water to people or guiding them to the breakfast table. It was necessary to simplify the robots as well as to carefully select the tasks they perform to ensure that they can be commercially viable products within four years.Our approach wasn’t to solve the first three problems of human-like hands, tactile perception and control of manipulation, but to avoid those robotic roadblocks. To address the fourth problem of human and robot interaction, we chose repetitive tasks to reduce complexity, since the expected interactions are – to a certain degree – predictable. Robots are a reality today in industry and they will appear in public spaces in more complex shapes than robot vacuum cleaners. But in the next two decades, robots will not be human-like, even if they might look like humans. Instead they will remain sophisticated machines. So you can stand down from any fear of a robot uprising in the near future. 2. Tactile perceptionThere is no technical match for the magnificent human and animal skin that encompasses a variety of tactile sensors. This perception is required for complex manipulation. Also, the software that processes the input from the sensors in robots is nowhere near as sophisticated as the human brain when it comes to interpretation and reaction to the messages received from the tactile sensors.3. Control of manipulationEven if we had artificial hands comparable to human hands and sophisticated artificial skin, we would still need to be able to design a way to control them to manipulate objects in a human-like way. Human children take years to do this and the learning mechanisms are not understood.4. Human and robot interactionThe interaction between humans is built on well-functioning speech and object recognition systems, as well as other sensors such as smell and taste and tactile sensing. While there has been significant progress in speech and object recognition, today’s systems can still only be used in rather controlled environments when a high degree of performance is required. Explore further read more

Why Blue Fireworks Are So Rare

first_img This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GameIf You’re Over 40 And Own A Computer, This Game Is A Must-Have!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoPrimeSolarQuotesCalifornia Signs Solar Law Helping Homeowners Save Hundreds A Month.PrimeSolarQuotesUndoDr. Marty Nature's Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat Food3 Signs Something’s Wrong Inside Your Cat’s BodyDr. Marty Nature’s Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat FoodUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoClassmatesSearch For Any High School Yearbook, It’s Free.ClassmatesUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndo In the earliest days of the United States, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail about the celebration of independence, “It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.” “Bonfires and illuminations” refer directly to what we know as pyrotechnics and firework displays. I’m a chemist and also president of Pyrotechnics Guild International, an organization that promotes the safe use of fireworks and using them here in the U.S. to celebrate Independence Day and other festivals throughout the year. As a chemist, and someone who leads demonstrations for chemistry students, I consider fireworks a great example of combustion reactions that produce colored fire. But the invention of colored fireworks is relatively recent and not all colors are easy to produce. Early history of fireworks Firecrackers were first invented serendipitously by the Chinese in 200 B.C. But it wasn’t until one thousand years later that Chinese alchemists developed fireworks in 800 A.D. These early fireworks were mostly bright and noisy concoctions designed to scare evil spirits — not the colorful, controlled explosions we see today. Fast forward another millennium and the Italians figured out how to add color by introducing various elements to the flammable mix. Adding the element strontium to a color pyrotechnic mix produces a red flame; copper, blue; barium, green; and sodium for yellow.These Sharks Were Too Busy to Notice a Bigger Predator Watching ThemThe unexpected twist at the end of this feeding frenzy delighted scientists.Credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really Loud00:35关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65860-why-blue-fireworks-are-rare.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2802:28  Too much or too little of the chemicals make significant changes in the temperature and thus the wavelength of color seen. The proper mixture of chemicals when ignited produce enough energy to excite electrons to give off different colors of light. Even though the chemistry of these colors isn’t new, each generation seems to get excited by the colors splashed across the sky. We now have a wide range of flame colors: red, green, blue, yellow, purple, and variations of these. Each color works the same way. As different elements ignite they release different wavelengths of light which translate as different colors. Making that perfect blue firework Not all colors of fireworks are equally easy to create. I believe several of my colleagues in pyrotechnic research and development would agree with me that blue is the most difficult color to produce. That is because the evening sky is a shade of blue, which means that most blues do not show up as well. If you try to make the blue brighter to contrast with the background it can look washed out. The right balance of copper and other chemicals in the flame or combustion reaction produce the best blue color flame in a firework. I have taken this into account when trying to create the best blue flame color, which I call pill box blue. It is just bright enough to stand out against the night sky but still a rich blue. I have over 20 blue pyrotechnic formulas and I have found one that comes very close to this elusive hue. Another difficulty in creating an intense blue color is that the chemistry is not simple. It requires a combination of several chemicals and the element copper. When copper ignites, the electrons surrounding the copper atoms get excited and energized in the flame. When the electrons release this energy, it appears to observers as blue light. Each color works the same way. As different elements ignite they release different wavelengths of light which translate as different colors. So when you see blue-colored dots of light creating a pattern in the night sky, you really are seeing excited electrons releasing energy as blue light. [Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter and get a digest of academic takes on today’s news, every day.] Paul E. Smith, Lecture Demonstrator for Chemistry, Purdue Universitylast_img read more