Waratahs charity strip to be auctioned off

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Concession (Tertiary full time student; pensioners) – Cat 1: $45, Cat 2: $35, Cat 3: $20, Cat 4: $15Family (2 Adult + 2 Junior) Cat 1: $150, Cat 2: $115, Cat 3: $75, Cat 4: $50 SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – MAY 14: Kurtley Beale of the Waratahs looks on during the round 14 Super 14 match between the Waratahs and the Hurricanes at Sydney Football Stadium on May 14, 2010 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images) Bid online for your favourite players’ jerseys on the Waratahs website. The auction will close on Wednesday 13 April 2011.Super Rugby – Round 7HSBC WARATAHS v CHIEFSSaturday 1 April 2011Sydney Football StadiumKick-off 7:40pmTICKETSAdult – Cat 1: $58, Cat 2: $44, Cat 3: $30, Cat 4: $20Junior (Age 4-15) – Cat 1: $35, Cat 2: $25, Cat 3: $15, Cat 4: $10 Kurtley Beale modelling last years charity stripFans can start their bidding on their favourite HSBC Waratah’s unique charity jersey which will be worn in the round seven clash with the Chiefs at the Sydney Football Stadium this Friday.As they have for the last two seasons, the HSBC Waratahs will again be driving its principal fundraising efforts for 2011 towards Cerebral Palsy Alliance which the squad visited this morning.Designed and produced by Canterbury, this year’s model is based on the 2010 charity jersey with the colours reversed to create a darker strip.The 22 player-worn jerseys will be cleaned, signed and then won by the highest bidder in the online auction now taking place on their website. The auction will close on Wednesday 13 April 2011.The association between the HSBC Waratahs and Cerebral Palsy Alliance started in 2009 with the launch of ‘Great Hands for Cerebral Palsy’. The feature fundraising effort was driven behind the auction of a special charity jersey and turned out to be a fantastic success.Last year’s charity jerseys used in the final round clash with the Hurricanes were auctioned off raising around $40,000. In addition, the season-long sale of a special charity cap produced by Canterbury – which will also be on sale in 2011 – proceeds from match program sales and other charity activities raised $94,839.The funds raised from this year’s charity match will be used to help ‘raise the roof’ of a new therapy centre for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance.In 2007 a major fire devastated Cerebral Palsy Alliance’s Allambie Heights site. The jersey auction, public sale of the charity jersey, cap, rugby ball and other initiatives are helping the HSBC Waratahs contribute to rebuilding on the site, and creating a state-of-the-art physiotherapy and treatment centre for kids with cerebral palsy.Fans who don’t wish to partake in the auction can still purchase the charity strip at Rebel Sport, Canterbury Stores or the Stadium Store. Click here purchase online.The charity fixture is being billed as Fast Friday with a host of the competition’s speed merchants set to take centre stage including Drew Mitchell, Sitiveni Sivivatu, Kurtley Beale, Tim Nanai-Williams, Atieli Pakalani, Lelia Masaga and Australia’s fastest footballer, Lachie Turner.Adding to the pace of the Super Rugby fixture, a pre-game race is set to determine the fastest player in Sydney club Rugby while the crowd will also be entertained before kick-off by the cast of internationally-acclaimed stage show, Jersey Boys, who will perform a medley of hits.Tickets start at just $20 for adults and $50 for a family of four.last_img read more

Be the best 10 you can be – tips from our Kicking Coach

first_imgFor Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit Surprise kicksThere are a few trick kicks that aren’t hard to execute and can surprise opponents because of the timing.The first is to kick against the grain of play. Often from a set-piece, the defence follows the ball across the field. So, if the No 10 receives a pass from a lineout on the right-hand touchline and he’s moving with the pass from right to left, he can suddenly change his angles and kick right.It may be that the defence originally covering for a kick into that area has now moved away and the ball bounces into an open space. A good chase might win possession and produce a clear route to the try-line.Another surprise kick we’re seeing more of from teams like the All Blacks is the chip or grubber out of the 22. With defences set up to close down the attack quickly and also cover the long clearance, there’s often a significant gap behind the first line of defence. So this surprise kick can lead to retention of the ball and a great attacking opportunity.This article appeared in the January 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. James Horwill chargin down a kick from Aaron Cruden of the All Blacks, during the World CupNo matter what level you play at, there’s a range of kicks that every team should have in its locker. Dan Cottrell of betterrugbycoaching.com explains what they are and when to use them.You can’t always make touch with a kick and sometimes you don’t want to anyway. Kicking into touch gives the opposition the throw-in and so, in all likelihood, first-phase possession.Instead, you can make your kicks contestable or containable. These kicks come in two parts: the kick and the chase. In both cases, the kick is only as good as the chase, and in some cases a poor kick can be still be made good by the chase.A contestable kick means both sides compete for the ball in the air. Either the kicker or his chasing team reach the dropping point of the kick with the opposition. The best outcomes range from retrieving the ball outright to making the opposition knock on.Even if the opposition catch the ball, a good chase puts the catcher on the ground, with the defence moving forward and the opposition scrambling back.A containable kick pushes the ball behind the defence, with the chasers reducing the time and space to run back. The kick needs to do two things: first, to make defenders run to the ball, ideally so they have to bend down to pick it up. Second, to force the defender on to his weaker side. For example, a right-footed full-back prefers to retrieve a ball running to his right as he doesn’t have to readjust as much to kick the ball.The containable kick needs at least two lines of chasers. The first line spreads across the field and comes up together with around ten to 12 players. The kicker and two or three others sit behind them to cover any kicks back. Some teams might send a quick player ahead to rush any decision.Get-out-of-jail kicksKicking to touch means giving up the lineout ball. However, it’s still a valid option in your own half.First, it will force the opposition further from your line. Contesting a high ball on the 22m line from your clearing kick is high risk.You won’t want to allow the opposition to counter-attack when you might be disorganised, so better to challenge their lineout and be reset in the back-line.Second, when the team is tired, a lineout and a chance to gather your breath is welcome. Defending another attack isn’t desirable, no matter how good your chase.Weather kicksOn wet days, sometimes it’s better to let the opposition have the ball and let them make the mistakes. Use a variety of high kicks, box kicks and low, driving kicks. The variety pulls the defence out of position. It’s better to err on the side of longer kicks because territory is important on wet days.On windy days, it’s better to keep the ball in hand with the wind in your face. If necessary, use contestable kicks to attempt to retain possession. Kicks to touch will catch the wind and not gain much territory. With the wind, kick out of your 22m area with containable kicks and then keep the ball in hand in their half. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.center_img Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Lions 2013: The key match-ups in Test 3

first_imgIsrael Folau v George NorthWell, big days deserve fireworks, don’t they? Australian rugby team player Gearge Smith poses during a photo shoot in Sydney on July 4, 2013. Experienced flanker George Smith has been recalled to the Wallabies for the deciding Test against the British and Irish Lions on July 6, 2013, four years after his last international appearance. The 32-year-old Smith is the sole survivor of Australia’s last series against the Lions 12 years ago and comes in for Michael Hooper as the Wallabies seek to retain the Tom Richards Trophy. AFP PHOTO / Saeed Khan (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Innocent bystanders may want to keep their arms and legs inside the vehicle at all times these two are near each other. You might not hear it coming, but it will be ugly.Adam Ashley-Cooper v Jonathan DaviesOk, so Davies is not O’Driscoll. We have moved on from that. He is, nonetheless, the gatekeeper to the Lions 13 channel, a place Ashley-Cooper wants to shepherd Kurtley Beale, Izzy Folau and Joseph Tomane through. It is a big responsibility to man that gap, and Davies has tended to step out of the line often in the previous Tests. He needs to be consistent.Wily, in an I have a deal with Acme-type of way, Ashley-Cooper will do anything to get over the gain line. He is a slavish worker for his team. Davies has a lot of planning ahead to do, whilst he is on the pitch, in real-time.Back in the pack: George Smith earns a recallGeorge Smith v Sean O’BrienLike a back-alley curry, you get to see George Smith all over again.He is back and he faces a man he has never met before. A chugging thumper who wants the ball in his mitts a lot. Smith has made a career out of chopping such men down and leaching onto their ball, but there are so many uncertainties here. No one knows if Smith is still up to international standard.If he is, O’Brien will struggle to stoop down to his level and may not shake him for the entire time he is on the pitch. If he isn’t, the Tullow Tank will ensure that the nuisance Hooper enters the fray. O’Brien has a long day ahead of him. Out of the tackle…: Wycliff Palu has been understated, but works for the team. Now he is facing a big collisionBy Alan DymockCOME SIX Nations time we always talk about Le Crunch when England meet France. In the final match of the British and Irish Lions series in Australia, though, with the tour set at one win apiece as we look to Sydney, this game looks crunchier than snail shells in your cereal.For this all-important day, the Lions coach has laid out an unexpected side while the Wallaby coach has stuck to an almost identical team, with the exception of the return of mystical openside George Smith.This all-or-nothing fixture will undoubtedly come down to a few moments of individual brilliance and with so many key match-ups throughout the sides, there is more than a passing chance that one or more of these confrontations will decide the result.Re-run: Phillips has another chanceWill Genia v Mike PhillipsThe return. The second-leg. The punchline. These two faced-off in the first Test, and although Phillips did not smear himself in glory as the firecracker Genia ran past him and away from him, Phillips still oversaw a Lions victory.Genia is currently the favourite for Man of the Series and dictates how the Wallabies play. However, with Warren Gatland tasking his team with bludgeoning Australia into submission, the two scrum-halves may meet under very different circumstances this time round.Wycliff Palu v Toby FaletauFaletau tends to take the softly, softly approach to speaking, be it to the press or with his teammates. In this series, though, he has beaten defenders like they have pinched his mother’s bottom. He has been merciless.Palu is another one who is understated but valued within his squad. While Ben Mowen and Michael Hooper have won plaudits, Palu has ben mashing rucks. He is strong and when allowed time to improve he can grow throughout a game, making more yards and posting bigger tackles.last_img read more

France v Wales live stream: How to watch

first_imgAlun Wyn Jones will equal Richie McCaw’s Test appearances record in Paris France v Wales live stream: How to watch from the UKThe good news is that France v Wales is available on free-to-air TV in the UK. It kicks off at 8.10pm tonight and will be shown live on ITV4 and Welsh language channel S4C. Mark Pougatch is presenting the ITV4 coverage, which starts at 7.30pm, with Gareth Thomas and James Hook providing analysis.If you want to watch S4C’s coverage, which also starts at 7.30pm, in Wales you can find it on Sky 104, Freeview 4, Virgin TV 166 and Freesat 104. In England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, it’s on Sky 134, Freesat 120 and Virgin TV 166.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when France v Wales takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.France v Wales live stream: How to watch from EuropeFrance 2, another free-to-air channel, has the rights to broadcast France v Wales (kick-off 9.10pm) in France.France v Wales live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, France v Wales (kick-off 6.10am early on Sunday morning) is live on beIN Sports 3.Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and also includes lots of European football action. Plus, there is currently a two-week FREE trial offer.You can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offer Long service: Alun Wyn Jones in action against France in February (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS France v Wales live stream: How to watchWales captain Alun Wyn Jones will equal Richie McCaw’s Test appearances record when he takes the field against France tonight in Paris (kick-off 8.10pm).The 35-year-old lock will win his 139th Wales cap in the first match of their autumn campaign and with nine Test appearances for the British & Irish Lions to his name as well, he will draw level with the All Black’s tally of 148.At the other end of the spectrum, 19-year-old winger Louis Rees-Zammit is set to make his international debut having been named on the bench by Wayne Pivac.Both Pivac and France coach Fabien Galthie have picked strong squads for this ‘warm-up’ fixture at the Stade de France. The friendly allows both teams to get a runout before the final Six Nations matches – for Wales against Scotland and France against Ireland – and then the Autumn Nations Cup.Jonathan Davies is back from long-term injury to start in midfield in a new centre pairing alongside Nick Tompkins while his brother, James, is on the bench. Hooker Sam Parry could also make his Wales debut as a replacement.France have made only one personnel change to the team that beat Wales in Cardiff earlier in the year. Vincent Rattez comes onto the wing, with Gael Fickou moving inside to centre and Arthur Vincent dropping to the bench.France: Anthony Bouthier; Teddy Thomas, Virimi Vakatawa, Gaël Fickou, Vincent Rattez; Romain Ntamack, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Bernard Le Roux, Paul Willemse, Francois Cros, Charles Ollivon (captain), Gregory Alldritt..Replacements: Camille Chat, Jean Baptiste Gros, Demba Bamba, Romain Taofifenua, Dylan Cretin, Baptiste Serin, Arthur Vincent, Thomas Ramos.Wales: Leigh Halfpenny; George North, Jonathan Davies, Nick Tompkins, Josh Adams; Dan Biggar, Rhys Webb; Rhys Carre, Ryan Elias, Samson Lee, Cory Hill, Alun Wyn Jones (captain), Aaron Wainwright, Justin Tipuric, Taulupe Faletau.Replacements: Sam Parry, Nicky Smith, Dillon Lewis, Seb Davies, James Davies, Gareth Davies, Rhys Patchell, Louis Rees-Zammit.Here’s how you can watch France v Wales wherever you are…How to watch France v Wales when abroadIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local rugby coverage, like France v Wales, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN France v Wales live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch France v Wales from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go. It kicks off at 9.10pm on SuperSport CSN, Grandstand and Rugby.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  France v Wales live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to France v Wales from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 8.10am on Sunday morning on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Former Bishop Pope dies in Baton Rouge surrounded by wife,…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Comments (9) [Episcopal News Service] Second Diocese of Fort Worth Bishop Clarence Pope died in his sleep Jan. 8 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.Pope, 81, will be buried from St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Baton Rouge, on Jan. 12. Visitation will begin at 10 a.m., with a Requiem Mass to begin at 11 a.m.Pope had been the second rector of St. Luke’s and it was from there that he was elected to be bishop coadjutor of Fort Worth on Sept. 14, 1984. He succeeded diocesan Bishop A. Donald Davies in January 2006.The Rev. Canon Chad Jones, rector of St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, Zachary, will celebrate and preach at Pope’s service. Interment at the Grace Episcopal Church Cemetery, St. Francisville, will follow immediately.Pope was reportedly being treated for pneumonia when he died. His wife, Dr. Martha Pope, and other members of his family had been with him during the week.Both the continuing Diocese of Forth Worth and the diocese made up of Episcopalians who left the wider Episcopal Church in late 2008 noted Pope’s death Jan. 9.Pope was the diocese’s second bishop, serving from 1986 to 1995. He announced in October 1994 that he intended to retire as diocesan bishop January 1, 1995, join the Roman Catholic Church and eventually seek ordination as a Roman Catholic priest. That effort would have been made under the Pastoral Provisions set in place by the Vatican in 1980 to allow married Episcopal priest to enter the Roman priesthood.After his announcement, Pope took sabbatical leave and turned over his administrative duties to the Rt. Rev. Jack Iker, who was bishop coadjutor at the time.He entered the Roman Catholic Church in early 1995 during a Mass celebrated by Cardinal Bernard Law of Boston. The mass was held at St. Mary the Virgin Catholic Church in Arlington, Texas, a former Episcopal congregation which Pope and the diocesan Standing Committee had allowed to leave the diocese in 1991 after a nearly unanimous vote of the congregation.In August 1995 Pope withdrew his letter of resignation from the House of Bishops and returned to the Episcopal Church. At the time, he told the New York Times that he had a “growing unease” with his decision because he would have to give up his episcopal orders to become a Roman Catholic priest. The House of Bishops had been scheduled to act on his resignation in September.Pope reportedly explored the Roman Catholic Church again for a period of time  in 1998 but returned in December of that year.Then in August 2007, Iker told his clergy that Pope had told him that he and his wife would be re-joining the Roman Catholic Church. Pope told Iker he had mailed a letter to Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori informing her of his decision. During a subsequent House of Bishops meeting in New Orleans the next month, Jefferts Schori announced that Pope had voluntarily renounced his Episcopal Church orders.Pope was a founder and first president of the Episcopal Synod of America, now Forward in Faith/North America.Iker, who said that he had lost “a valued mentor and beloved friend,” said Pope “will be remembered first as a loving pastor who cared deeply for his clergy and their families, and second as a defender of the historic faith and order of the catholic church.”Pope graduated from Centenary College and the University of the South and was ordained priest in 1955. He served as priest-in-charge at a number of missions in Louisiana and as rector of St. George’s, Bossier City, before being called to St. Luke’s, Baton Rouge, in 1963. He was a chaplain in the Air Force reserve for 10 years. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 January 13, 2012 at 9:08 pm I vividly remember Clarence prostrating himself during his ordination. I took his gesture to mean he fully understood his vow to “solemnly engage to conform to the doctrine, discipline, and worship of the Episcopal Church.” However, the church he must have thought he knew was undergoing sure and steady cultural change. So many of his fellow Episcopalians had already reconsidered and shed their historical positions as—in light of late 20th-Century thinking—un-American and undemocratic: note that we barely bat an eyelash at a layperson who divorces then remarries, or who sleeps with his/her betrothed before marriage, things that were ubiquitously scandalous before the Sexual Revolution of the 1960s.It looks to me like he was trying to find the church that spiritually nourished the Greatest Generation only to feel it slip between his fingers like dry sand.May he find in the life of the world to come what this world could never offer him. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By ENS staffPosted Jan 9, 2012 Brent Caldwell says: January 11, 2012 at 12:55 pm I knew Bishop Pope when he was at Trinity Baton Rouge. He was very young and needless to say so was I. He led my confirmation class which was informative, meaningful and lots of fun. He was able to keep our age group engaged. – a major plus for us and him. I appreciate his being an important part of my youth. Brent Caldwell Rector Knoxville, TN January 12, 2012 at 2:27 pm May he rest in peace. I presume Mr. Pope now knows which church is one and true, a question that vexed and puzzled him for many years. In the end, his confusion helped no one and he could not be said to be an adornment to either of the communions he favored at any given moment. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Rev. John T. Farrell says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL January 12, 2012 at 3:58 pm De mortuis nil nisi bonum dicendum est, Fr. Farrell. John Kirk says: January 14, 2012 at 9:40 pm May he rest in peace. But why are his funeral and burial Episcopalian? Peter Ots says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ January 21, 2012 at 2:04 am Peter Schickele (a.k.a P.D.Q. Bach’s “biographer”) once quipped, “Truth is Truth. You can’t have opinions about truth” during a soliloquy about P.D.Q.’s questioned authenticity (wow, what a mind!). That said, I don’t mind people saying they are uncomfortable with someone else’s views and actions.My own distaste came with the first article of the Constitution of the Diocese of Ft. Worth, which stated that it didn’t have to abide decisions of the ECUSA. If that’s the case, it should never have voted on any issue raised, because in a democracy, voting obligates you to abide the outcome. I always thought article was an I’m-going-to-take-my-marbles-and-go-home-but-then-I’m-going-to-tell-my-dad-on-you-and-he’ll-come-out-here-and-stomp-you-so-then-you’ll-be-sorry gold-plated diatribe.LOTS of Episcopalians aren’t wild about the direction the church is taking, but what we must fearlessly ask is, were we wrong? We don’t clamor to have the Churching of Women returned to common practice (q.v. BCP 1928). Why not? Birthing a child makes a woman unclean, or so the language strongly suggests, and it is based squarely on Scripture. Passing of bodily fluids is certainly messy but is it really an indication of judgment? Late 20th Century thinking and democratic thinking say “No!” Is that thinking right? I am inclined to believe it is.Our troubles as a church are more that we don’t listen to one another very well. Cooperation takes courage and humility; if you don’t have those qualities mastered, it’s impossible. Submit a Press Release Former Bishop Pope dies in Baton Rouge surrounded by wife, family AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis January 9, 2012 at 9:16 pm What about his cartoons? Leslie Scoopmire says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK January 17, 2012 at 4:13 pm Precisely the question. Are “un-American” and “undemocratic,” not to mention “late 20th-Century thinking,” the final standards against which Truth, as it exists (if it exists), are to be measured? If something is true, then my reaction to it, my “liking” of it, is of no effect on that Truth or Truths whatsoever. I can be pleased by the Truth or dismayed by the Truth. It wouldn’t alter the Truth at all. I pray that Bishop Pope arrived at that truth, that safe harbor, at last and that there his soul will rest in peace. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bill Dilworth says: Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Bill Dilworth says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Robert Anton Franken says: People Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC January 10, 2012 at 9:35 pm I’m puzzled by his reported funeral plans, given the fact that various Roman Catholic sites state Bishop Pope died a Roman Catholic. Rector Collierville, TN Peter Ots says: Submit an Event Listing Obituary, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Video: David Kilp’s favorite part of Scripture

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Video, Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Video: David Kilp’s favorite part of Scripture Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ EYE14, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 12, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [Episcopal News Service – Villanova, Pennsylvania] Episcopal Youth Event 2104 participant David Kilp from the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania tells why 1 Corinthians 12:24-27 is his favorite Bible verse.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Youth Event, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth & Young Adults Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Episcopal, Lutheran leaders in the U.S. and Canada issue Ash…

first_img Bill Louis says: March 1, 2017 at 9:13 pm I must agree with Christopher Epting’s response to your post, which is based on sound Christian theology. Richard McClellan says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC March 3, 2017 at 7:19 am Here here Christopher! Too many Christians in America would have you believe that Christ’s burial cloth was the good ole red, white and blue. This is no way any attack to the OP but being a Christian should, excuse the pun, TRUMP being an American. God bless us this Lenten season. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Refugees Migration & Resettlement March 3, 2017 at 7:23 am Not every immigrant is bent on the destruction of our faith. In fact, it could be a moment of evangelization. Methinks Bishop Curry would see it that way as well. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ray Donnelly says: March 8, 2017 at 3:06 pm Reverend Rebecca,I’m not sure what to say you and others who support allowing just anyone into our country without proper vetting. Anything can be justified with numbers (and Scripture). I chose 10 out of 1000 for 1% as an example not a fact. The vetting system you speak of the 2-3 year process is being used for those that come into our country legally and I’d have to agree that its working fairly well. However, it does not address the hordes of undocumented immigrants and refugees that have been swarming over our borders over the past several years. All those people had to do to be admitted was say the word “asylum” and they were passed through and given a court date for which a vast majority failed to appear.Lets discuss your logic for a moment. Auto accidents: vehicular transportation is a cornerstone of our culture. Without it we would have no food, jobs or an economy. Drivers must pass a test to have a license to drive. There are laws that govern the privilege of driving a motor vehicle and many lose that privilege when they violate the law. There are choices one makes the they get behind the wheel. Some make bad choices like driving intoxicated or texting while driving or driving inattentively. Those things are just some of the bad choices drivers make that cause a majority of fatal accidents. If we applied the same kinds of rules, licensing and adhering to laws for refugees then we wouldn’t be having this discussion.As for terrorist attacks per capita; If you used 3.64 billion for a base number you are may be talking about every person on planet Earth. There are many countries where terrorist attacks are more likely than in others like Iraq, Pakistan, Yemen, Niger, Afghanistan and recently Europe. Terror attacks are more likely to occur in countries where terrorists have gained a foot hold than in others where they have not so what is the incidence when just those countries are taken into consideration? There have been over 150,000 terrorist attacks since 1970, most of them can be attributed to the last ten or fifteen years. So that 3.64 billion number you suggest should be a lot smaller but even <1% in this or any other country would be unacceptable.Some examples of recent attacks where refugees are welcomed unfettered by extreme vetting are: France 2016, 12 attacks, 90 deaths, 453 injured, Germany 2016, 14 deaths, 76 injuries and Pakistan, too numerous to count. This year alone (2017) there are 295 incidents in more than a dozen countries. Why should risk bringing this to our country by allowing people to come improperly vetted?One other question to ponder, why are the oil rich countries of the Middle East like Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Qatar not responding to providing refuge to millions of refugees and innocent children who are suffering and dying in Syria? Why does the USA need to function as the foster parent of the world?We have an abundance of poor families with children and homeless people including veterans to feed, clothe and shelter in our own country. They are strangers too. The expected response is that we have programs for them but if they are working so well then why are there still poor and homeless?.You speak of the Gospel mandate to welcome strangers. I agree as Christians we need to follow Jesus' example but not blindly. Is it un-Christian to be cautious? I. think not. Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Jon Spangler says: The Rev. D. Rebecca Dinovo says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Sue Heilman says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Kathleen Hammerquist says: Tony Oberdorfer says: March 6, 2017 at 2:50 pm If there was a large container filled with 1000 gum drops but ten and only ten were poisoned. How many would you eat? On the same note if only10 of 1000 refugees came to this country to do us harm and your neighbor’s children or were harmed or killed, what would you say to your neighbor? I do not believe its over cautious to know who we are allowing in our country without knowing who they are and if they intend to do us harm. To do otherwise is foolish. P. Barnwell Collins says: [Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry joined March 1 with Anglican and Lutheran leaders in North America in issuing an Ash Wednesday message titled “Remember the Refugees and Migrants.”Curry joined Anglican Church of Canada Primate Fred Hiltz, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Presiding Bishop Elizabeth A. Eaton and Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada National Bishop Susan C. Johnson, in sending the message. The following is the full text of the message:“On this day many people will participate in a liturgy including the Imposition of Ashes.  Some presiders blot these ashes upon our foreheads and we are reminded that we are but dust and to dust shall we return.  Others trace them upon our forehead in the sign of the cross, a reminder of the place to where the Lenten journey takes us.  Even at the outset of this holy season we are reminded that while for some the cross is a stumbling block and for others mere foolishness, it is for those who are being called, the power of God and the wisdom of God (1 Corinthians 1:23).  Remembering Christ crucified we are mindful not only of our personal need for repentance and renewal in doing the work of God, but indeed of the need of all humanity to repent of our indifference to the brokenness of our relationships, to the suffering of millions of people worldwide who are starving, oppressed, enslaved, or seeking sanctuary even if it be in a place far from their homeland.“This Lent we call our Churches to be continually mindful of the global refugee and migration crises, and the injustices and conflicts that have swelled the statistics to a number greater than ever in the history of the world.  We acknowledge the good work done by so many of our synods and dioceses and parishes in sponsoring refugees, welcoming them, accompanying them and advocating for them as they settle in our countries.  Similarly, we commend the compassionate work of our partner churches in other lands and intergovernmental bodies caring for migrants and refugees. We call on our Churches not to weary of this good work in the name of God.“Given the current political climate in the United States, it is important to say that while both our countries recognize the need for measures ensuring homeland security, we also stand up for the long-established policies that welcome migrants and refugees.  That is not to say any of them are not beyond reform.  But it is to say that fair and generous policies strengthen the economy of our nations and enriches the social and cultural fabric of our countries – a fabric woven by both the First Peoples of these lands and all those who have settled here through numerous waves of migration throughout our histories. “Fair and generous action and deliberations are from our perspective, deeply grounded in the Law of Moses, in the teaching of the Prophets and in the Gospel of Jesus.  For some two millennia millions of people have found consolation in the suffering of Jesus upon the cross and in his holy name they have prayed for the compassion and justice of God in the midst of the terrible circumstances of their lives – circumstances that compel them to flee their homelands, making their way over dangerous treks of land. Sometimes they find refuge in new nations and frequently they make their way to ports where they can board vessels and make what are often treacherous voyages in the hope of reaching a land free of the oppression they have known.  Some make it.  Many don’t.“May this Season of Lent be especially marked by our prayers and advocacy for refugees and migrants – on the run, in United Nations camps, in waiting, in our communities… And let it be marked by a continuing resolve in welcoming the strange in our midst, for such hospitality is in keeping with the faith we proclaim. (Matthew 25:31-40)” Kenton Sandine says: Episcopal, Lutheran leaders in the U.S. and Canada issue Ash Wednesday message on refugees Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT March 1, 2017 at 9:31 pm Thank you, Christopher Epting. Advocacy Peace & Justice, Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ecumenical & Interreligious, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 4, 2017 at 7:49 am Yes, Jesus would choose loving his enemies, ie. the rare immigrant that might harm him or us, rather than cast out the multitudes out of fear. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH March 1, 2017 at 8:34 pm Amen, Brother. Church and state are not synonymous nor congruent. Our Christian calling is the higher commitment. Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group March 1, 2017 at 7:49 pm Actually, we do NOT have a “Christian duty to protect our nation.” We may have an American duty to do so, but let us not wrap this pragmatic responsibility with religious vesture. Christ calls us to risk loving and embracing everyone. Emily Chatfield-Lusto says: March 7, 2017 at 3:07 pm Hi Bill, The extremely thorough vetting system that has been in place in the US does a very good job at doing exactly what you (and all of us) desire when admitting refugees, which is “knowing who they are and if they intend to do us harm.” It’s been soooo good a system that NOT A SINGLE REFUGEE has ever killed anyone in an act of terror in America since the Refugee Act of 1980. But using your logic, let’s think about it this way:Chance of dying in an auto accident in your lifetime: 1 in 606.Chance of dying in an auto accident per year: 1 in 47,718.Chance of dying at the hand of refugee attack per year: 1 in 3.64 BILLLION.(Yes that is BILLION, not million… see the CATO Institute to fact check this and note that your numbers are waayyyyy off). You see, we’re totally okay with the risk of automobile use because it’s super convenient and fast, but providing refuge to millions of refugees and innocent children who are suffering and dying in Syria and around the world during the worst refugee crisis in world history is “too risky.” ?The logic dazzles the mind. Fear is driving these policies and the support of them, but fear of what? The facts and hard evidence don’t seem to factor into the equation. Christians need to be in line with the Gospel mandate and Jesus’ call to welcome the stranger as to Christ himself. Posted Mar 1, 2017 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bill Louis says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 1, 2017 at 9:56 pm Thank you, Christopher. You said it better than I could have. We are called to lay down our lives. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (15) Richard McClellan says: Rector Bath, NC Christopher Epting says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 2, 2017 at 10:50 am Christopher, I so much appreciate your response to complex conditions. Our fears become visible when we publicly contradict Jesus’ saying, “Be not afraid.” While Jesus is not advocating foolhardiness, he would not have made the remark had he not observed fellow citizens being overwhelmed by fear. Fear, in this context, is self-serving. Jesus was not self-serving. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Pjcabbiness says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release March 2, 2017 at 9:42 am Excellent and loving distinction. We need to say this over and over. Thank you for saying it now. March 1, 2017 at 5:57 pm We also have a Christian duty to protect our nation from infiltration and harm by foreign persons who espouse and promote a totalitarian ideology and theology. As Christians, we need to be open to the Alien and the immigrant but we must be careful, deliberate and wise in our approach to this issue. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET March 2, 2017 at 11:51 am Our Christian calling hardly demands of us that we embrace those bent on our destruction and the demise of Christianity. By definition anybody who suggests that cannot be a true Christian. Tags Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Anglican bishops in Sri Lanka advise clergy to ‘prayerfully discern’…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Apr 26, 2019 Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican bishops in Sri Lanka advise clergy to ‘prayerfully discern’ whether to hold services [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishops of the Anglican Church of Ceylon have written to clergy, wardens and lay leadership urging them to “prayerfully discern whether it is prudent to hold the worship” on Sunday, April 28. Their advice comes following the terror attacks a week ago in which around 235 people were killed when bombs detonated at churches and hotels as Christians in the country celebrated Easter.Read the full article here. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

New Year’s Resolution: Live Happier

first_img Please enter your comment! 6 great ways to live a fulfilled and balanced 2017Saving money and staying fit are traditional New Year’s resolutions, but overly packed schedules and the materialistic focus of modern day life are inspiring a new goal for many people: to live happier in 2016 and beyond.“To make 2017 the happiest year ever, think about how you rest, eat and move,” says Matt Johnson, health and performance expert and president of On Target Living. “I am a believer that mental health is directly related to physical health. For most of human existence we have viewed the mind – the head – different from the physical body of the neck down. New research is showing they have everything to do with each other. If you want optimal physical health, you need optimal mental health and happiness. When people are happier they tend to improve all aspects of their life.”Johnson offers six surprisingly simple, yet profoundly effective ways to boost mood and overall happiness in the new year:Make sleep a priorityGetting seven to eight hours of sleep each night is critical for the body to produce hormones that trigger happiness, explains Johnson.“I am a big fan of always going to bed with a positive attitude,” he says. “If you go to bed angry, worried or stressed, that tends to come back the next day. Do what you can before bed to reset your mood. Read, take a bath, exercise or talk face-to-face. Try to avoid screen time.”Make more time for family“Over the last 20 years, family time has vanished. Sporting events, projects, work and technology have swallowed this time,” says Johnson. “As the author of the cookbook Target to Table, I think family face-to-face time is the most important part of a healthy family relationship and happiness.”Johnson suggests planning family dinner two to three times a week. “When we start to eat dinner as a family in the home, our health and happiness will follow,” he notes.Carve out whitespaceWhitespace is time you dedicate to yourself to refresh, unplug and rejuvenate. This could be making time to do yoga, enjoy a hobby, read, meditate or take a bath.“People who have hobbies and activities that give them balance tend to be happier,” Johnson says. “If your hobby is texting, checking social media or watching TV, this will set you up for a feeling of emptiness. These things are fine in short periods, but too much will take away what life is giving us.”Achieve work-life balanceWith the expanse of the Internet and mobile commuting, workers are now connected more than ever before. But this connectedness can get out of control when answering emails 24/7, so work-life balance is important for overall happiness.“We all want to be successful, but with anything you need proper balance,” says Johnson. “If you look at professional athletes, the best ones try to find activities outside of their sport that help them stay hungry, engaged and excited. Find things that help you create balance in your life.”Fuel happiness from within“I believe we have more behavior and mental health issues than we should, and a big part of this is the lack of proper nutrients,” says Johnson. “The most important nutrient when it comes to brain health and mood is omega-3s.”America is one of the most deficient countries when it comes to omega-3s, with an estimated 91 percent of people not getting enough. “The way that I encourage people to get omega-3s is Nordic Naturals orange-flavored Arctic Cod Liver Oil – it tastes like an orange oil drop,” Johnson says. “Adding Nordic Naturals cod liver oil to your diet can be a game changer for your mental health.”Embrace gratitudeThinking of the things you are grateful for can have a dramatic effect on your satisfaction and overall happiness. Do this daily as you wake up or make it a conversation you have with your children right before bed.“Telling yourself you are grateful for your health, family, friends, job and life gives you that pat on the back we all need,” Johnson says. “I also think we don’t tell people how much we appreciate them until they are gone. I encourage everyone to write a handwritten letter to one person each year who made a huge impact in their life. They may not know or maybe you don’t tell them often enough. My last letter was to my Mom. She is the glue in our family. TAGSLive Happier Previous articleYouth step-up to help the underprivilegedNext articleCity announces holiday garbage pick-up schedule Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more

Traffic Alert: Detour scheduled for Thursday

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSTraffic AlertWekiva Parkway Previous articleIs your teenager ready for their own car?Next article100-million-plus Americans expected to vacation this year Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Kelly Park Road bridge work continuesFrom The Florida Department of TransportationOn Thursday, February 9th, crews will close Kelly Park Road between Round Lake Road and Plymouth Sorrento Road as part of building the Wekiva Parkway (State Road 429). The closure from 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. will allow crews to finish painting bridge beams over Kelly Park Road.Traffic will be detoured via Round Lake Road, Ponkan Road and Plymouth Sorrento Road during the closure. Flaggers will direct traffic and electronic message boards are posted to alert drivers.Electronic message boards will be posted to alert drivers. Bad weather or other unforeseen circumstances could delay or prolong work. Motorists are urged to use caution in the construction area for their safety and that of the work crews.This work is part of the Central Florida Expressway’s $46.6 million project to build the Wekiva Parkway from Ponkan Road to a planned interchange at Kelly Park Road. Work began August 3, 2015, and is scheduled to finish in the spring of 2017.This project is among five parkway sections being built by CFX, totaling 10 miles and more than $270 million in construction costs. Once completed, the 25-mile parkway will complete Central Florida’s beltway, while helping to protect the natural resources surrounding the Wekiva River.For more details, go here. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment!last_img read more